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dc.contributor.authorGiovannitti, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Christian B.
dc.contributor.authorSbircea, Dan-Tiberiu
dc.contributor.authorInal, Sahika
dc.contributor.authorDonahue, Mary
dc.contributor.authorNiazi, Muhammad Rizwan
dc.contributor.authorHanifi, David A.
dc.contributor.authorAmassian, Aram
dc.contributor.authorMalliaras, George G.
dc.contributor.authorRivnay, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorMcCulloch, Iain
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-24T13:47:21Z
dc.date.available2016-10-24T13:47:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-07
dc.identifier.citationGiovannitti A, Nielsen CB, Sbircea D-T, Inal S, Donahue M, et al. (2016) N-type organic electrochemical transistors with stability in water. Nature Communications 7: 13066. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13066.
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms13066
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621160
dc.description.abstractOrganic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are receiving significant attention due to their ability to efficiently transduce biological signals. A major limitation of this technology is that only p-type materials have been reported, which precludes the development of complementary circuits, and limits sensor technologies. Here, we report the first ever n-type OECT, with relatively balanced ambipolar charge transport characteristics based on a polymer that supports both hole and electron transport along its backbone when doped through an aqueous electrolyte and in the presence of oxygen. This new semiconducting polymer is designed specifically to facilitate ion transport and promote electrochemical doping. Stability measurements in water show no degradation when tested for 2 h under continuous cycling. This demonstration opens the possibility to develop complementary circuits based on OECTs and to improve the sophistication of bioelectronic devices.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank EPSRC Project EP/G037515/1, EC FP7 Project SC2 (610115), EC FP7 Project ArtESun (604397), EC FP7 POLYMED 612538, the Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale, the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (PolyProbe), and the Marie Curie ITNs OLIMPIA and OrgBio for financial support. D.A.H. was supported in part by an award from The Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans and NSF-GFRP. Use of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13066
dc.rights(C) The Author(s) 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleN-type organic electrochemical transistors with stability in water
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Solar Center (KSC)
dc.contributor.departmentMaterial Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentOrganic Electronics and Photovoltaics Group
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalNature Communications
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
dc.contributor.institutionMaterials Research Institute and School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Bioelectronics, École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CMP-EMSE, MOC Gardanne 13541, France
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
dc.contributor.institutionPalo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
kaust.personNiazi, Muhammad Rizwan
kaust.personAmassian, Aram
kaust.personMcCulloch, Iain
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T12:57:06Z
dc.date.published-online2016-10-07
dc.date.published-print2016-12


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(C) The Author(s) 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as (C) The Author(s) 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.