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dc.contributor.advisorShamma, Jeff S.
dc.contributor.authorMendoza Chavez, Gilberto
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-02T06:03:06Z
dc.date.available2017-08-04T00:00:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.citationMendoza Chavez, G. (2016). Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms. KAUST Research Repository. https://doi.org/10.25781/KAUST-3K1X6
dc.identifier.doi10.25781/KAUST-3K1X6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/617821
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectModel Predictive Control
dc.subjectAutonomous systems
dc.subjectTrojectory trucking
dc.subjectQuadcoptor
dc.subjectSystem Identification
dc.titleAutonomous Landing on Moving Platforms
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
dc.rights.embargodate2017-08-04
thesis.degree.grantorKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology
dc.contributor.committeememberGhanem, Bernard
dc.contributor.committeememberKnio, Omar
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
dc.rights.accessrightsAt the time of archiving, the student author of this thesis opted to temporarily restrict access to it. The full text of this thesis became available to the public after the expiration of the embargo on 2017-08-04.
refterms.dateFOA2017-08-04T00:00:00Z


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