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dc.contributor.authorAli, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorRathnayake, Rathnayake M.L.D.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lei
dc.contributor.authorIshii, Satoshi
dc.contributor.authorKindaichi, Tomonori
dc.contributor.authorSatoh, Hisashi
dc.contributor.authorToyoda, Sakae
dc.contributor.authorYoshida, Naohiro
dc.contributor.authorOkabe, Satoshi
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T10:34:54Z
dc.date.available2016-06-23T10:34:54Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-21
dc.identifier.citationSource identification of nitrous oxide emission pathways from a single-stage nitritation-anammox granular reactor 2016, 102:147 Water Research
dc.identifier.issn00431354
dc.identifier.pmid27340816
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2016.06.034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/614390
dc.description.abstractNitrous oxide (N2O) production pathway in a signal-stage nitritation-anammox sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated based on a multilateral approach including real-time N2O monitoring, N2O isotopic composition analysis, and in-situ analyses of spatial distribution of N2O production rate and microbial populations in granular biomass. N2O emission rate was high in the initial phase of the operation cycle and gradually decreased with decreasing NH4+ concentration. The average emission of N2O was 0.98 ± 0.42% and 1.35 ± 0.72% of the incoming nitrogen load and removed nitrogen, respectively. The N2O isotopic composition analysis revealed that N2O was produced via NH2OH oxidation and NO2− reduction pathways equally, although there is an unknown influence from N2O reduction and/or anammox N2O production. However, the N2O isotopomer analysis could not discriminate the relative contribution of nitrifier denitrification and heterotrophic denitrification in the NO2− reduction pathway. Various in-situ techniques (e.g. microsensor measurements and FISH (fluorescent in-situ hybridization) analysis) were therefore applied to further identify N2O producers. Microsensor measurements revealed that approximately 70% of N2O was produced in the oxic surface zone, where nitrifiers were predominantly localized. Thus, NH2OH oxidation and NO2 reduction by nitrifiers (nitrifier-denitrification) could be responsible for the N2O production in the oxic zone. The rest of N2O (ca. 30%) was produced in the anammox bacteria-dominated anoxic zone, probably suggesting that NO2− reduction by coexisting putative heterotrophic denitrifiers and some other unknown pathway(s) including the possibility of anammox process account for the anaerobic N2O production. Further study is required to identify the anaerobic N2O production pathways. Our multilateral approach can be useful to quantitatively examine the relative contributions of N2O production pathways. Good understanding of the key N2O production pathways is essential to establish a strategy to mitigate N2O emission from biological nitrogen removal processes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was financially supported by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) CREST, Nagase Science and Technology Foundation, and Institute for Fermentation, Osaka (IFO), which were granted to S. Okabe. Authors express gratitude to the Gene Science Division, Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development, Hiroshima University for their technical support for FISH analysis. Authors are thankful for Yoshitaka Uchida (Assistant Professor, Hokkaido University) for useful discussion and providing technical support for dissolved N2O measurements.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043135416304729
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Water Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Water Research, 16 June 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2016.06.034
dc.subjectN2O production pathway
dc.subjectNitritation-anammox reactor
dc.subjectMicrosensors
dc.subjectN2O isotopomer analysis
dc.subjectFISH
dc.titleSource identification of nitrous oxide emission pathways from a single-stage nitritation-anammox granular reactor
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalWater Research
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13, West-8, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628, Japan
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Soil, Water and Climate, University of Minnesota, 258 Borlaug Hall, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environmental Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502, Japan
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personAli, Muhammad
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2016-06-21
dc.date.published-print2016-10


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