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dc.contributor.authorOosterkamp, Margreet J.
dc.contributor.authorMéndez-García, Celia
dc.contributor.authorKim, Chang-H.
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorIbáñez, Ana B.
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Sabrina
dc.contributor.authorHong, Pei-Ying
dc.contributor.authorCann, Isaac K.
dc.contributor.authorMackie, Roderick I.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T08:31:24Z
dc.date.available2016-06-14T08:31:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-06
dc.identifier.citationLignocellulose-derived thin stillage composition and efficient biological treatment with a high-rate hybrid anaerobic bioreactor system 2016, 9 (1) Biotechnology for Biofuels
dc.identifier.issn1754-6834
dc.identifier.pmid27274357
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13068-016-0532-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/613004
dc.description.abstractBackground This study aims to chemically characterize thin stillage derived from lignocellulosic biomass distillation residues in terms of organic strength, nutrient, and mineral content. The feasibility of performing anaerobic digestion on these stillages at mesophilic (40 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) temperatures to produce methane was demonstrated. The microbial communities involved were further characterized. Results Energy and sugar cane stillage have a high chemical oxygen demand (COD of 43 and 30 g/L, respectively) and low pH (pH 4.3). Furthermore, the acetate concentration in sugar cane stillage was high (45 mM) but was not detected in energy cane stillage. There was also a high amount of lactate in both types of stillage (35–37 mM). The amount of sugars was 200 times higher in energy cane stillage compared to sugar cane stillage. Although there was a high concentration of sulfate (18 and 23 mM in sugar and energy cane stillage, respectively), both thin stillages were efficiently digested anaerobically with high COD removal under mesophilic and thermophilic temperature conditions and with an organic loading rate of 15–21 g COD/L/d. The methane production rate was 0.2 L/g COD, with a methane percentage of 60 and 64, and 92 and 94 % soluble COD removed, respectively, by the mesophilic and thermophilic reactors. Although both treatment processes were equally efficient, there were different microbial communities involved possibly arising from the differences in the composition of energy cane and sugar cane stillage. There was more acetic acid in sugar cane stillage which may have promoted the occurrence of aceticlastic methanogens to perform a direct conversion of acetate to methane in reactors treating sugar cane stillage. Conclusions Results showed that thin stillage contains easily degradable compounds suitable for anaerobic digestion and that hybrid reactors can efficiently convert thin stillage to methane under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Furthermore, we found that optimal conditions for biological treatment of thin stillage were similar for both mesophilic and thermophilic reactors. Bar-coded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified different microbial communities in mesophilic and thermophilic reactors and these differences in the microbial communities could be linked to the composition of the thin stillage.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe greatly appreciate the help of Glen Austin (BP pilot plant, Jennings, LA, USA), Michael Masters (Energy Biosciences Institute, Urbana, IL, USA), Daniel Webb and Kaye Surratt (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL, USA), Michael Harland and Robert Brown (School of Chemical Sciences, Machine Shop, Urbana, IL, USA), Chris Wright and Álvaro Hernández (W.M. Keck Center, Roy J. Carver Biotechnology Center, Urbana, IL, USA). We thank three anonymous reviewers for critical reading and their comments.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://biotechnologyforbiofuels.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13068-016-0532-z
dc.rightsThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.subjectThin stillage
dc.subjectLignocellulose
dc.subjectMethane
dc.subjectAnaerobic digestion
dc.subjectMesophilic
dc.subjectThermophilic
dc.subjectHybrid reactor
dc.titleLignocellulose-derived thin stillage composition and efficient biological treatment with a high-rate hybrid anaerobic bioreactor system
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalBiotechnology for Biofuels
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Genomic Biology, and Department of Animal Sciences, Energy Biosciences Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W Gregory Dr, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Animal, Life and Environment Science, Biogas Research Center, Hankyong National University, 327 Jungang‑ro, Anseong‑si, Gyeonggi‑do 456‑749, South Korea.
dc.contributor.institutionEnergy Biosciences Institute, University of California at Berkeley, 120A Energy Biosciences Building, 2151 Berkeley Way, MC 5230, Berkeley, CA, 94729, USA.
dc.contributor.institutionBP Biofuels, University of California at Berkeley, 120A Energy Biosciences Building, 2151 Berkeley Way, MC 5230, Berkeley, CA 94729, USA.
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personHong, Pei-Ying
dc.relation.issupplementedbyDOI:10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3622145
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T04:42:50Z
display.relations<b> Is Supplemented By:</b> <br/> <ul><li><i>[Dataset]</i> <br/> Oosterkamp, M., Méndez-García, C., Chang-H. Kim, Bauer, S., Ibáñez, A., Zimmerman, S., … Mackie, R. (2016). Lignocellulose-derived thin stillage composition and efficient biological treatment with a high-rate hybrid anaerobic bioreactor system. Figshare. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3622145. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3622145">10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3622145</a> HANDLE: <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10754/624136">10754/624136</a></li></ul>
dc.date.published-online2016-06-06
dc.date.published-print2016-12


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