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dc.contributor.authorvan de Water, Jeroen A. J. M.
dc.contributor.authorMelkonian, Rémy
dc.contributor.authorJunca, Howard
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.contributor.authorReynaud, Stéphanie
dc.contributor.authorAllemand, Denis
dc.contributor.authorFerrier-Pagès, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T08:28:09Z
dc.date.available2016-06-14T08:28:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-06
dc.identifier.citationSpirochaetes dominate the microbial community associated with the red coral Corallium rubrum on a broad geographic scale 2016, 6:27277 Scientific Reports
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.pmid27263657
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep27277
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/613002
dc.description.abstractMass mortality events in populations of the iconic red coral Corallium rubrum have been related to seawater temperature anomalies that may have triggered microbial disease development. However, very little is known about the bacterial community associated with the red coral. We therefore aimed to provide insight into this species’ bacterial assemblages using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons generated from samples collected at five locations distributed across the western Mediterranean Sea. Twelve bacterial species were found to be consistently associated with the red coral, forming a core microbiome that accounted for 94.6% of the overall bacterial community. This core microbiome was particularly dominated by bacteria of the orders Spirochaetales and Oceanospirillales, in particular the ME2 family. Bacteria belonging to these orders have been implicated in nutrient cycling, including nitrogen, carbon and sulfur. While Oceanospirillales are common symbionts of marine invertebrates, our results identify members of the Spirochaetales as other important dominant symbiotic bacterial associates within Anthozoans.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank the Paul Hamel Foundation, EC Project MAGICPAH (FP7-KBBE-2009-245226), Colciencias and Project CIAS-1470 UMNG 2014 for providing research funding. Eric Galvez and Marcela Villegas are thanked for preliminary data analysis, and Eric Beraud and Cecile Rottier for assistance with sample collection. We also thank the two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep27277
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleSpirochaetes dominate the microbial community associated with the red coral Corallium rubrum on a broad geographic scale
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reports
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionCentre Scientifique de Monaco, 8 Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000, Monaco
dc.contributor.institutionMicrobiomas Foundation – Division of Ecogenomics and Holobionts, Chía, Colombia
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personVoolstra, Christian R.
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T10:43:07Z
dc.date.published-online2016-06-06
dc.date.published-print2016-07


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