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dc.contributor.authorNing, Zhijun
dc.contributor.authorGong, Xiwen
dc.contributor.authorComin, Riccardo
dc.contributor.authorWalters, Grant
dc.contributor.authorFan, Fengjia
dc.contributor.authorVoznyy, Oleksandr
dc.contributor.authorYassitepe, Emre
dc.contributor.authorBuin, Andrei
dc.contributor.authorHoogland, Sjoerd
dc.contributor.authorSargent, Edward H.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-28T05:51:00Z
dc.date.available2016-02-28T05:51:00Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-16
dc.identifier.citationNing Z, Gong X, Comin R, Walters G, Fan F, et al. (2015) Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids. Nature 523: 324–328. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14563.
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836
dc.identifier.issn1476-4687
dc.identifier.pmid26178963
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nature14563
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599431
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Heteroepitaxy - atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate - is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned 'dots-in-a-matrix' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication is based, in part, on work supported by an award (KUS-11-009-21) from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), by the Ontario Research Fund Research Excellence Program and by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. Computations were performed using the BlueGene/Q supercomputer at the SciNet HPC Consortium provided through the Southern Ontario Smart Computing Innovation Platform (SOSCIP). E.Y. acknowledges support from an FAPESP-BEPE (14/18327-9) fellowship. The authors thank L. Levina for assistance in CQD synthesis, E. Beauregard for assistance in PHC synthesis, Z. Yang and M. Adachi for discussions, and E. Palmiano, R. Wolowiec and D. Kopilovic for their help during the course of study.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.titleQuantum-dot-in-perovskite solids
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalNature
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
kaust.grant.numberKUS-11-009-21
dc.date.published-online2015-07-16
dc.date.published-print2015-07


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