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dc.contributor.authorDuong, Duc T.
dc.contributor.authorHo, Victor
dc.contributor.authorShang, Zhengrong
dc.contributor.authorMollinger, Sonya
dc.contributor.authorMannsfeld, Stefan C.B.
dc.contributor.authorDacuña, Javier
dc.contributor.authorToney, Michael F.
dc.contributor.authorSegalman, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorSalleo, Alberto
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:41:16Z
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:41:16Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-09
dc.identifier.citationDuong DT, Ho V, Shang Z, Mollinger S, Mannsfeld SCB, et al. (2014) Mechanism of Crystallization and Implications for Charge Transport in Poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) Thin Films. Advanced Functional Materials 24: 4515–4521. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201304247.
dc.identifier.issn1616-301X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adfm.201304247
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598789
dc.description.abstractIn this work, crystallization kinetics and aggregate growth of poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) (P3EHT) thin films are studied as a function of film thickness. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption show that individual aggregates and crystallites grow anisotropically and mostly along only two packing directions: the alkyl stacking and the polymer chain backbone direction. Further, it is also determined that crystallization kinetics is limited by the reorganization of polymer chains and depends strongly on the film thickness and average molecular weight. Time-dependent, field-effect hole mobilities in thin films reveal a percolation threshold for both low and high molecular weight P3EHT. Structural analysis reveals that charge percolation requires bridged aggregates separated by a distance of ≈2-3 nm, which is on the order of the polymer persistence length. These results thus highlight the importance of tie molecules and inter-aggregate distance in supporting charge percolation in semiconducting polymer thin films. The study as a whole also demonstrates that P3EHT is an ideal model system for polythiophenes and should prove to be useful for future investigations into crystallization kinetics. Recrystallization kinetics and its relationship to charge transport in poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) (P3EHT) thin films are investigated using a combination of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, and field-effect transistor measurements. These results show that thin film crystallization kinetics is limited by polymer chain reorganization and that charge percolation depends strongly on the edge-to-edge distance between aggregates. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
dc.description.sponsorshipA.S. gratefully acknowledges financial support from the National Science Foundation (DMR 1205752 award). D.T.D. is supported by a Stanford Graduate Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. S. M. is supported by a Stanford Graduate Fellowship. J.D. was supported by the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (Award No. KUS-C1-015-21), made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). A portion of this research was carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectcharge transport
dc.subjectconjugated polymers
dc.subjectorganic field-effect transistors
dc.subjectorganic semiconductors
dc.subjectthin films
dc.titleMechanism of Crystallization and Implications for Charge Transport in Poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) Thin Films
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Functional Materials
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering; Stanford University; Stanford California 94305 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of California, Berkeley; Materials Science Division; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Berkeley California 94720 USA
dc.contributor.institutionStanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Menlo Park California 94025 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Electrical Engineering Stanford University; Stanford California 94305 USA
kaust.grant.numberKUS-C1-015-21
kaust.grant.fundedcenterCenter for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (CAMP)
dc.date.published-online2014-04-09
dc.date.published-print2014-07


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