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dc.contributor.authorHEPPELL, J.
dc.contributor.authorTALBOYS, P.
dc.contributor.authorPAYVANDI, S.
dc.contributor.authorZYGALAKIS, K. C.
dc.contributor.authorFLIEGE, J.
dc.contributor.authorWITHERS, P. J. A.
dc.contributor.authorJONES, D. L.
dc.contributor.authorROOSE, T.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:31:23Z
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:31:23Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-24
dc.identifier.citationHEPPELL J, TALBOYS P, PAYVANDI S, ZYGALAKIS KC, FLIEGE J, et al. (2014) How changing root system architecture can help tackle a reduction in soil phosphate (P) levels for better plant P acquisition. Plant Cell Environ 38: 118–128. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pce.12376.
dc.identifier.issn0140-7791
dc.identifier.pmid24891045
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pce.12376
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598516
dc.description.abstract© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The readily available global rock phosphate (P) reserves may run out within the next 50-130 years, causing soils to have a reduced P concentration which will affect plant P uptake. Using a combination of mathematical modelling and experimental data, we investigated potential plant-based options for optimizing crop P uptake in reduced soil P environments. By varying the P concentration within a well-mixed agricultural soil, for high and low P (35.5-12.5mgL-1 respectively using Olsen's P index), we investigated branching distributions within a wheat root system that maximize P uptake. Changing the root branching distribution from linear (evenly spaced branches) to strongly exponential (a greater number of branches at the top of the soil) improves P uptake by 142% for low-P soils when root mass is kept constant between simulations. This causes the roots to emerge earlier and mimics topsoil foraging. Manipulating root branching patterns, to maximize P uptake, is not enough on its own to overcome the drop in soil P from high to low P. Further mechanisms have to be considered to fully understand the impact of P reduction on plant development.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank the BBSRC and DEFRA (BB/I024283/1) for funding S.P. and The Royal Society University Research Fellowship for funding T.R. K.C.Z. was partially funded by Award No. KUK-C1-013-04 of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST); J.F. by EPSRC and CORMSIS; J.H. by EPSRC Complexity DTC (EP/G03690X/1); and S.P., P.T., D.L.J. and T.R. by DEFRA, BBSRC, Scottish Government, AHDB, and other industry partners through Sustainable Arable LINK Project LK09136. We would also like to thank two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments that improved the manuscript.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectModelling
dc.subjectPlant nutrient uptake
dc.subjectRhizosphere
dc.subjectRoot architecture
dc.subjectTriticum aestivum
dc.titleHow changing root system architecture can help tackle a reduction in soil phosphate (P) levels for better plant P acquisition
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalPlant, Cell & Environment
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Complex Systems Simulation; University of Southampton; Southampton SO17 1BJ
dc.contributor.institutionMathematical Sciences, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences; University of Southampton; Southampton SO17 1BJ
dc.contributor.institutionCentre of Operational Research, Management Sciences and Information Systems; University of Southampton; Southampton SO17 1BJ
dc.contributor.institutionIFLS Crop Systems Engineering; University of Southampton; Southampton SO17 1BJ
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography; University of Bangor; Bangor LL57 2UW UK
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Engineering and the Environment; University of Southampton; Southampton SO17 1BJ
kaust.grant.numberKUK-C1-013-04
dc.date.published-online2014-06-24
dc.date.published-print2015-01


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