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dc.contributor.authorSrivastava, Samanvaya
dc.contributor.authorSchaefer, Jennifer L.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Zichao
dc.contributor.authorTu, Zhengyuan
dc.contributor.authorArcher, Lynden A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T12:27:58Z
dc.date.available2016-02-25T12:27:58Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-09
dc.identifier.citationSrivastava S, Schaefer JL, Yang Z, Tu Z, Archer LA (2013) 25th Anniversary Article: Polymer-Particle Composites: Phase Stability and Applications in Electrochemical Energy Storage. Advanced Materials 26: 201–234. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201303070.
dc.identifier.issn0935-9648
dc.identifier.pmid24323839
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201303070
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/597209
dc.description.abstractPolymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created. In favorable situations, the spatial distribution of these interfaces can be controlled to create new hybrid materials with physical and transport properties inaccessible in their constituents or poorly prepared mixtures. This review surveys progress in the last decade in understanding phase behavior, structure, and properties of nanoparticle-polymer composites. The review takes a decidedly polymers perspective and explores how physical and chemical approaches may be employed to create hybrids with controlled distribution of particles. Applications are studied in two contexts of contemporary interest: battery electrolytes and electrodes. In the former, the role of dispersed and aggregated particles on ion-transport is considered. In the latter, the polymer is employed in such small quantities that it has been historically given titles such as binder and carbon precursor that underscore its perceived secondary role. Considering the myriad functions the binder plays in an electrode, it is surprising that highly filled composites have not received more attention. Opportunities in this and related areas are highlighted where recent advances in synthesis and polymer science are inspiring new approaches, and where newcomers to the field could make important contributions. Polymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created that can be exploited for applications. The fundamental approaches and bottom-up synthesis strategies for understanding and controlling nanoparticle dispersion in polymers are reviewed. Applications of these approaches for creating polymer-particle composite electrolytes and electrodes for energy storage are also considered. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article is part of an ongoing series celebrating the 25th anniversary of Advanced Materials. This publication is based on work supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Award No. DMR-1006323; by the Energy Materials Center at Cornell, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001086; and by Award No. KUS-C1-018-02, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). This work made use of the electron microscopy facility at the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR), an NSF-supported MRSEC through Grant DMR-1120296.
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.subjectelectrodes
dc.subjectelectrolytes
dc.subjectlithium ion batteries
dc.subjectnanocomposites
dc.subjectphase stability
dc.title25th Anniversary Article: Polymer-Particle Composites: Phase Stability and Applications in Electrochemical Energy Storage
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Materials
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Cornell University; Ithaca NY 14853 USA
dc.contributor.institutionNOHMs Technologies, Inc.; 2582 Research Park Drive Lexington KY 40511 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Material Science and Engineering; Cornell University; Ithaca NY 14853 USA
kaust.grant.numberKUS-C1-018-02


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