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dc.contributor.authorMongin, Mathieu
dc.contributor.authorBaird, Mark E.
dc.contributor.authorTilbrook, Bronte
dc.contributor.authorMatear, Richard J.
dc.contributor.authorLenton, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHerzfeld, Mike
dc.contributor.authorWild-Allen, Karen
dc.contributor.authorSkerratt, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorMargvelashvili, Nugzar
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Barbara J.
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.contributor.authorGustafsson, Malin S. M.
dc.contributor.authorRalph, Peter J.
dc.contributor.authorSteven, Andrew D. L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T09:32:14Z
dc.date.available2016-02-24T09:32:14Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-23
dc.identifier.citationThe exposure of the Great Barrier Reef to ocean acidification 2016, 7:10732 Nature Communications
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.pmid26907171
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms10732
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/597083
dc.description.abstractThe Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is founded on reef-building corals. Corals build their exoskeleton with aragonite, but ocean acidification is lowering the aragonite saturation state of seawater (Ωa). The downscaling of ocean acidification projections from global to GBR scales requires the set of regional drivers controlling Ωa to be resolved. Here we use a regional coupled circulation–biogeochemical model and observations to estimate the Ωa experienced by the 3,581 reefs of the GBR, and to apportion the contributions of the hydrological cycle, regional hydrodynamics and metabolism on Ωa variability. We find more detail, and a greater range (1.43), than previously compiled coarse maps of Ωa of the region (0.4), or in observations (1.0). Most of the variability in Ωa is due to processes upstream of the reef in question. As a result, future decline in Ωa is likely to be steeper on the GBR than currently projected by the IPCC assessment report.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was undertaken with the support of CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, and through resources made available through the eReefs project, the CSIRO Marine and Coastal Carbon Biogeochemistry Cluster, and the Australian Climate Change Science Program. The observations at Yongala were sourced as part of the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS)—IMOS is supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and the Super Science Initiative. We thank Sven Uthicke for making his observations publically available, Professorss Tom Trull and Sabina Belli for their constructive comments on the manuscript, Miles Furnas who willingly shared his knowledge of the region and provided observations and three anonymous reviewers.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms10732
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThe exposure of the Great Barrier Reef to ocean acidification
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalNature Communications
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionCSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Tasmania 7000, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAntarctic Climate and Ecosystems Co-operative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania 7000, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionCSIRO Land and Water, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionPlant Functional Biology and Climate Change Cluster (C3), Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2007, Australia
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personDuarte, Carlos M.
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T15:36:28Z
dc.date.published-online2016-02-23
dc.date.published-print2016-04


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