Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSiegert, Michael
dc.contributor.authorYates, Matthew D
dc.contributor.authorCall, Douglas F
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Xiuping
dc.contributor.authorSpormann, Alfred
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T09:35:07Z
dc.date.available2016-02-21T09:35:07Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-26
dc.identifier.citationSiegert M, Yates MD, Call DF, Zhu X, Spormann A, et al. (2014) Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis. ACS Sustainable Chem Eng 2: 910–917. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sc400520x.
dc.identifier.issn2168-0485
dc.identifier.issn2168-0485
dc.identifier.pmid24741468
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/sc400520x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596838
dc.description.abstractIn methanogenic microbial electrolysis cells (MMCs), CO2 is reduced to methane using a methanogenic biofilm on the cathode by either direct electron transfer or evolved hydrogen. To optimize methane generation, we examined several cathode materials: plain graphite blocks, graphite blocks coated with carbon black or carbon black containing metals (platinum, stainless steel or nickel) or insoluble minerals (ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide), and carbon fiber brushes. Assuming a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production rates were insufficient to explain methane production. At -600 mV, platinum on carbon black had the highest abiotic hydrogen gas formation rate (1600 ± 200 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) and the highest biotic methane production rate (250 ± 90 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). At -550 mV, plain graphite (76 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) performed similarly to platinum (73 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Coulombic recoveries, based on the measured current and evolved gas, were initially greater than 100% for all materials except platinum, suggesting that cathodic corrosion also contributed to electromethanogenic gas production.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are indebted to John Cantolina of the Materials Science Center at Penn State University for help with ESEM and Hiroyuki Kashima and Yongtae Alm for technical assistance. This research was supported by the Global Climate and Energy Program (GCEP) and by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST, award KUS-I1-003-13).
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
dc.rightsThis is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.
dc.rights.urihttp://pubs.acs.org/page/policy/authorchoice_termsofuse.html
dc.subjectGraphite
dc.subjectCarbon Black
dc.subjectMicrobially Influenced Corrosion
dc.subjectPolyacrylonitrile
dc.subjectBiocathode
dc.subjectMicrobial Electrolysis Cell
dc.subjectCarbon Capturing And Sequestration
dc.subjectPower-to-gas
dc.titleComparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis.
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3982937
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University , University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University , University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States ; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University , Syracuse, New York 13244, United States.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University , Stanford, California 94305, United States.
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T14:21:01Z
dc.date.published-online2014-02-26
dc.date.published-print2014-04-07


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
PMC3982937.pdf
Size:
3.531Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record