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dc.contributor.authorYi, Ying
dc.contributor.authorButtner, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorFoulds, Ian G.
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T14:44:47Z
dc.date.available2016-01-19T14:44:47Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationYi Y, Buttner U, Foulds IG (2015) A cyclically actuated electrolytic drug delivery device. Lab Chip 15: 3540–3548. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c5lc00703h.
dc.identifier.issn1473-0197
dc.identifier.issn1473-0189
dc.identifier.pmid26198777
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/c5lc00703h
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594268
dc.description.abstractThis work, focusing on an implantable drug delivery system, presents the first prototype electrolytic pump that combines a catalytic reformer and a cyclically actuated mode. These features improve the release performance and extend the lifetime of the device. Using our platinum (Pt)-coated carbon fiber mesh that acts as a catalytic reforming element, the cyclical mode is improved because the faster recombination rate allows for a shorter cycling time for drug delivery. Another feature of our device is that it uses a solid-drug-in-reservoir (SDR) approach, which allows small amounts of a solid drug to be dissolved in human fluid, forming a reproducible drug solution for long-term therapies. We have conducted proof-of-principle drug delivery studies using such an electrolytic pump and solvent blue 38 as the drug substitute. These tests demonstrate power-controlled and pulsatile release profiles of the chemical substance, as well as the feasibility of this device. A drug delivery rate of 11.44 ± 0.56 μg min-1 was achieved by using an input power of 4 mW for multiple pulses, which indicates the stability of our system. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
dc.titleA cyclically actuated electrolytic drug delivery device
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical Engineering Program
dc.identifier.journalLab Chip
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Engineering, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC, Canada
kaust.personButtner, Ulrich
kaust.personFoulds, Ian G.


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