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dc.contributor.authorMohamed, Lamees
dc.contributor.authorSultan, Mohamed
dc.contributor.authorSaad, Ahmed Mohamed
dc.contributor.authorZaki, Abotalib
dc.contributor.authorSauck, William
dc.contributor.authorSoliman, Farouk
dc.contributor.authorYan, Eugene
dc.contributor.authorElkadiri, Racha
dc.contributor.authorAbouelmagd, Abdou
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T13:21:24Z
dc.date.available2016-01-19T13:21:24Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-09
dc.identifier.citationMohamed L, Sultan M, Ahmed M, Zaki A, Sauck W, et al. (2015) Structural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai. Surveys in Geophysics 36: 717–742. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10712-015-9331-5.
dc.identifier.issn0169-3298
dc.identifier.issn1573-0956
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10712-015-9331-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594091
dc.description.abstractAn integrated [very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic, magnetic, remote sensing, field, and geographic information system (GIS)] study was conducted over the basement complex in southern Sinai (Feiran watershed) for a better understanding of the structural controls on the groundwater flow. The increase in satellite-based radar backscattering values following a large precipitation event (34 mm on 17–18 January 2010) was used to identify water-bearing features, here interpreted as preferred pathways for surface water infiltration. Findings include: (1) spatial analysis in a GIS environment revealed that the distribution of the water-bearing features (conductive features) corresponds to that of fractures, faults, shear zones, dike swarms, and wadi networks; (2) using VLF (43 profiles), magnetic (7 profiles) techniques, and field observations, the majority (85 %) of the investigated conductive features were determined to be preferred pathways for groundwater flow; (3) northwest–southeast- to north–south-trending conductive features that intersect the groundwater flow (southeast to northwest) at low angles capture groundwater flow, whereas northeast–southwest to east–west features that intersect the flow at high angles impound groundwater upstream and could provide potential productive well locations; and (4) similar findings are observed in central Sinai: east–west-trending dextral shear zones (Themed and Sinai Hinge Belt) impede south to north groundwater flow as evidenced by the significant drop in hydraulic head (from 467 to 248 m above mean sea level) across shear zones and by reorientation of regional flow (south–north to southwest–northeast). The adopted integrated methodologies could be readily applied to similar highly fractured basement arid terrains elsewhere. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Space Agency[11920]
dc.description.sponsorshipNorth Atlantic Treaty Organization[SFP 982614]
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.subjectGroundwater flow
dc.subjectMagnetic
dc.subjectRadar backscattering
dc.subjectRemote sensing
dc.subjectSinai
dc.subjectVery low frequency
dc.titleStructural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalSurveys in Geophysics
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI, United States
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geology, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, United States
kaust.personAbouelmagd, Abdou
dc.date.published-online2015-07-09
dc.date.published-print2015-09


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