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dc.contributor.authorBonin, Mary C.
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Hugo B.
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, David H.
dc.contributor.authorFrisch, Ashley J.
dc.contributor.authorSaenz Agudelo, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.
dc.contributor.authorJones, Geoffrey P.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T12:53:01Z
dc.date.available2015-12-09T12:53:01Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-19
dc.identifier.citationThe role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef 2015:n/a Molecular Ecology
dc.identifier.issn09621083
dc.identifier.pmid26589106
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.13484
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/583495
dc.description.abstractThe development of parentage analysis to track the dispersal of juvenile offspring has given us unprecedented insight into the population dynamics of coral reef fishes. These tools now have the potential to inform fisheries management and species conservation, particularly for small fragmented populations under threat from exploitation and disturbance. In this study we resolve patterns of larval dispersal for a population of the anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus in the Keppel Islands (southern Great Barrier Reef). Habitat loss and fishing appear to have impacted this population and a network of no-take marine reserves currently protects 75% of the potential breeders. Using parentage analysis, we estimate that 21% of recruitment in the island group was generated locally, and that breeding adults living in reserves were responsible for 79% (31 out of 39) of these of locally-produced juveniles. Overall, the network of reserves was fully connected via larval dispersal; however one reserve was identified as a critical source of larvae for the island group. The population in the Keppel Islands also appears to be well-connected to other source populations at least 60 km away, given that 79% (145 out of 184) of the juveniles sampled remained unassigned in the parentage analysis. We estimated the effective size of the A. melanopus metapopulation to be 745 (582-993 95% CI) and recommend continued monitoring of its genetic status. Maintaining connectivity with populations beyond the Keppel Islands and recovery of local recruitment habitat, potentially through active restoration of host anemone populations, will be important for its long-term persistence.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.13484
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Bonin, M. C., Harrison, H. B., Williamson, D. H., Frisch, A. J., Saenz-Agudelo, P., Berumen, M. L. and Jones, G. P. (2015), The role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef. Mol Ecol. Accepted Author Manuscript., which has been published in final form at http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.13484. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
dc.titleThe role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Ecology
dc.relation.referencesBonin, M. C., Harrison, H. B., Williamson, D. H., Frisch, A. J., Saenz-Agudelo, P., Berumen, M. L., & Jones, G. P. (2015). Data from: The role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef (Version 1) [Data set]. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.dj050
dc.relation.referencesDOI:10.5061/DRYAD.DJ050
dc.relation.referencesHANDLE:http://hdl.handle.net/10754/624179
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; James Cook University; Townsville QLD 4811 Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; James Cook University; Townsville QLD 4811 Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; James Cook University; Townsville QLD 4811 Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; James Cook University; Townsville QLD 4811 Australia
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas; Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile; Valdivia Chile
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; James Cook University; Townsville QLD 4811 Australia
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Marine & Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personSaenz Agudelo, Pablo
kaust.personBerumen, Michael L.
refterms.dateFOA2016-11-21T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2016-01-19
dc.date.published-print2016-01


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