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dc.contributor.authorFedoroff, Nina V.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T08:58:33Z
dc.date.available2015-08-12T08:58:33Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-13
dc.identifier.issn00278424
dc.identifier.pmid23150590
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1215482109
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/565994
dc.description.abstractIn 1950, Barbara McClintock published a Classic PNAS article, "The origin and behavior of mutable loci in maize," which summarized the evidence leading to her discovery of transposition. The article described a number of genome alterations revealed through her studies of the Dissociation locus, the first mobile genetic element she identified. McClintock described the suite of nuclear events, including transposon activation and various chromosome aberrations and rearrangements, that unfolded in the wake of genetic crosses that brought together two broken chromosomes 9. McClintock left future generations with the challenge of understanding how genomes respond to genetic and environmental stresses by mounting adaptive responses that frequently include genome restructuring.
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.titleMcClintock's challenge in the 21st century
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3528499
dc.contributor.institutionHuck Institutes of the Life Sciences, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States
kaust.personFedoroff, Nina V.


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