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dc.contributor.authorMansour, Mohy S.
dc.contributor.authorElbaz, Ayman M.
dc.contributor.authorZayed, M. F.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T07:24:54Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T07:24:54Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-23
dc.identifier.citationMansour, M. S., Elbaz, A. M., & Zayed, M. F. (2014). Flame Kernel Generation and Propagation in Turbulent Partially Premixed Hydrocarbon Jet. Combustion Science and Technology, 186(4-5), 698–711. doi:10.1080/00102202.2014.883850
dc.identifier.issn00102202
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00102202.2014.883850
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/564911
dc.description.abstractFlame development, propagation, stability, combustion efficiency, pollution formation, and overall system efficiency are affected by the early stage of flame generation defined as flame kernel. Studying the effects of turbulence and chemistry on the flame kernel propagation is the main aim of this work for natural gas (NG) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG). In addition the minimum ignition laser energy (MILE) has been investigated for both fuels. Moreover, the flame stability maps for both fuels are also investigated and analyzed. The flame kernels are generated using Nd:YAG pulsed laser and propagated in a partially premixed turbulent jet. The flow field is measured using 2-D PIV technique. Five cases have been selected for each fuel covering different values of Reynolds number within a range of 6100-14400, at a mean equivalence ratio of 2 and a certain level of partial premixing. The MILE increases by increasing the equivalence ratio. Near stoichiometric the energy density is independent on the jet velocity while in rich conditions it increases by increasing the jet velocity. The stability curves show four distinct regions as lifted, attached, blowout, and a fourth region either an attached flame if ignition occurs near the nozzle or lifted if ignition occurs downstream. LPG flames are more stable than NG flames. This is consistent with the higher values of the laminar flame speed of LPG. The flame kernel propagation speed is affected by both turbulence and chemistry. However, at low turbulence level chemistry effects are more pronounced while at high turbulence level the turbulence becomes dominant. LPG flame kernels propagate faster than those for NG flame. In addition, flame kernel extinguished faster in LPG fuel as compared to NG fuel. The propagation speed is likely to be consistent with the local mean equivalence ratio and its corresponding laminar flame speed. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work is financially supported by the joint project between Cairo University, Egypt, and North Carolina State University, USA. The project title is "Computational and Experimental Studies of Turbulent Premixed Flame Kernels." The project ID is 422.
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.subjectFlame kernel
dc.titleFlame kernel generation and propagation in turbulent partially premixed hydrocarbon jet
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Center
dc.identifier.journalCombustion Science and Technology
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical Power Engineering Department, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical Power Engineering Department, Helwan University, Ain Helwan, Egypt
kaust.personElbaz, Ayman M.
dc.date.published-online2014-04-23
dc.date.published-print2014-05-04


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