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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ji
dc.contributor.authorJing, Wei
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, William L.
dc.contributor.authorFang, Tiegang
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:11:03Z
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:11:03Z
dc.date.issued2014-11
dc.identifier.issn00162361
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.fuel.2014.06.071
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563813
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel, namely fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and diesel fuel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. The KL factor is a parameter for soot concentration, where K is an absorption coefficient and proportional to the number density of soot particles, L is the geometric thickness of the flame along the optical detection axis, and KL factor is proportional to soot volume fraction. The main objective is to explore a combustion regime called high-temperature and highly-diluted combustion (HTHDC) and compare it with the conventional and low-temperature combustion (LTC) modes. The three different combustion regimes are implemented under different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1400 K) and ambient oxygen concentrations (10%, 15%, and 21%). Results are presented in terms of soot temperature and KL factor images, time-resolved pixel-averaged soot temperature, KL factor, and spatially integrated KL factor over the soot area. The time-averaged results for these three regimes are compared for both diesel and biodiesel fuels. Results show complex combined effects of the ambient temperature and oxygen concentration, and that two-color temperature for the HTHDC mode at the 10% oxygen level can actually be lower than the conventional mode. Increasing ambient oxygen and temperature increases soot temperature. Diesel fuel results in higher soot temperature than biodiesel for all three regimes. Results also show that diesel and biodiesel fuels have very different burning and sooting behavior under the three different combustion regimes. For diesel fuel, the HTHDC regime offers better results in terms of lower soot than the conventional and LTC regimes, and the 10% O2, 1400 K ambient condition shows the lowest soot concentration while maintaining a moderate two-color temperature. For biodiesel, the 15% O2, 800 K ambient condition shows some advantages in terms of reducing soot concentration. Based on these results, the practical implementation of this combustion mode is outlined and a feasible option is proposed. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported in part by the Faculty Research and Professional Development (FRPD) Fund from the North Carolina State University and by the Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-0854174. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.subjectBiodiesel
dc.subjectHigh temperature highly diluted combustion
dc.subjectSoot
dc.subjectSpray combustion
dc.subjectTwo-color thermometry
dc.titleSoot measurements for diesel and biodiesel spray combustion under high temperature highly diluted ambient conditions
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalFuel
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Oval Drive-Campus, Box 7910, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States
kaust.personRoberts, William L.


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