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dc.contributor.authorGao, Zhaoming
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yong
dc.contributor.authorLee, Onon
dc.contributor.authorTian, Renmao
dc.contributor.authorWong, Yuehim
dc.contributor.authorBougouffa, Salim
dc.contributor.authorBatang, Zenon B.
dc.contributor.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.
dc.contributor.authorLafi, Feras Fawzi
dc.contributor.authorBajic, Vladimir B.
dc.contributor.authorQian, Pei-Yuan
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:53:18Z
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-24
dc.identifier.citationGao, Z.-M., Wang, Y., Lee, O. O., Tian, R.-M., Wong, Y. H., Bougouffa, S., … Qian, P.-Y. (2014). Pyrosequencing Reveals the Microbial Communities in the Red Sea Sponge Carteriospongia foliascens and Their Impressive Shifts in Abnormal Tissues. Microbial Ecology, 68(3), 621–632. doi:10.1007/s00248-014-0419-0
dc.identifier.issn00953628
dc.identifier.pmid24760170
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-014-0419-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563510
dc.description.abstractAbnormality and disease in sponges have been widely reported, yet how sponge-associated microbes respond correspondingly remains inconclusive. Here, individuals of the sponge Carteriospongia foliascens under abnormal status were collected from the Rabigh Bay along the Red Sea coast. Microbial communities in both healthy and abnormal sponge tissues and adjacent seawater were compared to check the influences of these abnormalities on sponge-associated microbes. In healthy tissues, we revealed low microbial diversity with less than 100 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per sample. Cyanobacteria, affiliated mainly with the sponge-specific species “Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum,” were the dominant bacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Intraspecies dynamics of microbial communities in healthy tissues were observed among sponge individuals, and potential anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were found. In comparison with healthy tissues and the adjacent seawater, abnormal tissues showed dramatic increase in microbial diversity and decrease in the abundance of sponge-specific microbial clusters. The dominated cyanobacterial species Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum decreased and shifted to unspecific cyanobacterial clades. OTUs that showed high similarity to sequences derived from diseased corals, such as Leptolyngbya sp., were found to be abundant in abnormal tissues. Heterotrophic Planctomycetes were also specifically enriched in abnormal tissues. Overall, we revealed the microbial communities of the cyanobacteria-rich sponge, C. foliascens, and their impressive shifts under abnormality.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank WP Zhang and G Zhang from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and the technical team from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for technical help during sample collection. The authors also thank Professor Rob von Soest, Zoological Museum, University of Amsterdam, for identification of sponges. This study was supported by a grant (U13012056) from the National Science Foundation of China, a grant from China Ocean Mineral Resource Research and Development Association (COMRRDA12SC02), and an award (SA-C0040/UK-C0016) granted to P.Y. Qian from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. FFL is supported by the KAUST Special Collaborative Partnership grant. VBB is supported by the KAUST Base Research Funds.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.titlePyrosequencing Reveals the Microbial Communities in the Red Sea Sponge Carteriospongia foliascens and Their Impressive Shifts in Abnormal Tissues
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Mathematics and Computational Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agriculture
dc.contributor.departmentCoastal and Marine Resources Core Lab
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalMicrobial Ecology
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water BayHong Kong, China
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory of Marine Biogenetic Resources, Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration (SOA)Xiamen, China
dc.contributor.institutionSanya Institute of Deep Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of SciencesHai Nan, China
kaust.personBougouffa, Salim
kaust.personAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.
kaust.personLafi, Feras Fawzi
kaust.personBajic, Vladimir B.
kaust.personBatang, Zenon B.
kaust.grant.numberSA-C0040/UK-C0016
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitSpecial Collaborative Partnership
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitKAUST Base Research Funds
dc.date.published-online2014-04-24
dc.date.published-print2014-10


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