Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChehab, Noura A.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Dong
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascal
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:11:20Z
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:11:20Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-18
dc.identifier.issn01757598
dc.identifier.pmid23775270
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00253-013-5025-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562815
dc.description.abstractA large percentage of organic fuel consumed in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is lost as a result of oxygen transfer through the cathode. In order to understand how this oxygen transfer affects the microbial community structure, reactors were operated in duplicate using three configurations: closed circuit (CC; with current generation), open circuit (OC; no current generation), and sealed off cathodes (SO; no current, with a solid plate placed across the cathode). Most (98 %) of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed during power production in the CC reactor (maximum of 640 ± 10 mW/m 2), with a low percent of substrate converted to current (coulombic efficiency of 26.5 ± 2.1 %). Sealing the cathode reduced COD removal to 7 %, but with an open cathode, there was nearly as much COD removal by the OC reactor (94.5 %) as the CC reactor. Oxygen transfer into the reactor substantially affected the composition of the microbial communities. Based on analysis of the biofilms using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, microbes most similar to Geobacter were predominant on the anodes in the CC MFC (72 % of sequences), but the most abundant bacteria were Azoarcus (42 to 47 %) in the OC reactor, and Dechloromonas (17 %) in the SO reactor. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were most predominant, with sequences most similar to Methanobacterium in the CC and SO reactor, and Methanocorpusculum in the OC reactors. These results show that oxygen leakage through the cathode substantially alters the bacterial anode communities, and that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominate despite high concentrations of acetate. The predominant methanogens in the CC reactor most closely resembled those in the SO reactor, demonstrating that oxygen leakage alters methanogenic as well as general bacterial communities. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was sponsored by a PhD fellowship, a Global Research Partnership-Collaborative Fellows award (GRP-CF-2011-14-S), KAUST Award KUS-I1-003-13 (Bruce E. Logan) and discretionary investigator funds (Pascal E. Saikaly) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). Special thanks are extended to Hari Ananda Rao for PCR assistance and Mohammed Alarawi and Dr. Shahjahan Ali of the Bioscience Core Laboratory at KAUST for 454 pyrosequencing.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.subject16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing
dc.subjectAir-cathode
dc.subjectMicrobial community
dc.subjectOxygen intrusion
dc.titleCharacterization of bacterial and archaeal communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells, open circuit and sealed-off reactors
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Biotechnology Research Group
dc.identifier.journalApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States
kaust.personChehab, Noura A.
kaust.personLi, Dong
kaust.personAmy, Gary L.
kaust.personSaikaly, Pascal


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record