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dc.contributor.authorLautenschläger, Karin
dc.contributor.authorHwang, Chiachi
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Wentso
dc.contributor.authorBoon, Nico
dc.contributor.authorKöster, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.
dc.contributor.authorEgli, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorHammes, Frederik A.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:05:49Z
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:05:49Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.citationLautenschlager, K., Hwang, C., Liu, W.-T., Boon, N., Köster, O., Vrouwenvelder, H., … Hammes, F. (2013). A microbiology-based multi-parametric approach towards assessing biological stability in drinking water distribution networks. Water Research, 47(9), 3015–3025. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2013.03.002
dc.identifier.issn00431354
dc.identifier.pmid23557697
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2013.03.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562789
dc.description.abstractBiological stability of drinking water implies that the concentration of bacterial cells and composition of the microbial community should not change during distribution. In this study, we used a multi-parametric approach that encompasses different aspects of microbial water quality including microbial growth potential, microbial abundance, and microbial community composition, to monitor biological stability in drinking water of the non-chlorinated distribution system of Zürich. Drinking water was collected directly after treatment from the reservoir and in the network at several locations with varied average hydraulic retention times (6-52h) over a period of four months, with a single repetition two years later. Total cell concentrations (TCC) measured with flow cytometry remained remarkably stable at 9.5 (±0.6)×104cells/ml from water in the reservoir throughout most of the distribution network, and during the whole time period. Conventional microbial methods like heterotrophic plate counts, the concentration of adenosine tri-phosphate, total organic carbon and assimilable organic carbon remained also constant. Samples taken two years apart showed more than 80% similarity for the microbial communities analysed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454 pyrosequencing. Only the two sampling locations with the longest water retention times were the exceptions and, sofar for unknown reasons, recorded a slight but significantly higher TCC (1.3(±0.1)×105cells/ml) compared to the other locations. This small change in microbial abundance detected by flow cytometry was also clearly observed in a shift in the microbial community profiles to a higher abundance of members from the Comamonadaceae (60% vs. 2% at other locations). Conventional microbial detection methods were not able to detect changes as observed with flow cytometric cell counts and microbial community analysis. Our findings demonstrate that the multi-parametric approach used provides a powerful and sensitive tool to assess and evaluate biological stability and microbial processes in drinking water distribution systems. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank Fangqiong Ling, and Hideyuki Tamaki for their help with the microbial community analysis. We are grateful to the financial support of the EU project TECHNEAU (018320).
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.subjectAOC
dc.subjectATP
dc.subjectBDOC
dc.subjectBiological stability
dc.subjectCFU
dc.subjectDGGE
dc.subjectFCM
dc.subjectFlow cytometry
dc.subjectHPC
dc.subjectMicrobial community composition
dc.subjectOTU
dc.subjectPyrosequencing
dc.subjectTOC
dc.titleA microbiology-based multi-parametric approach towards assessing biological stability in drinking water distribution networks
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.identifier.journalWater Research
dc.contributor.institutionEawag, Swiss Federal Institute for Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 133, CH-8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, CH-8092 Zürich, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, United States
dc.contributor.institutionGhent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Gent, Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionZürich Water Supply (WVZ), Hardhof 9 , P.O. Box 1179, CH-8021 Zürich, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionDelft University of Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology Group, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, Netherlands
kaust.personVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.


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