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dc.contributor.authorStingl, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorNgugi, David
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Luke R.
dc.contributor.authorAntunes, Andre
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:01:53Z
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:01:53Z
dc.date.issued2012-10
dc.identifier.issn09470867
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12268-012-0231-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562348
dc.description.abstractThe Red Sea is an unusually harsh marine environment, characterized by high temperature and salinity. It also harbors some of the most extreme environments on earth, the Deep Sea Brine Pools. Here, we report on the microbial communities in these environments. The water column is dominated by SAR11 and Prochlorococcus, which have developed specific adaptations to withstand the conditions. The Brine Pools have only been poorly characterized so far, and only four pure cultures are described. © Springer-Verlag 2012.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.titleMarine microbiology: Microbial ecology of the Red Sea [Mikrobielle Ökologie des Roten Meeres]
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Microbial Ecology Research Group
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.identifier.journalBIOspektrum
kaust.personStingl, Ulrich
kaust.personNgugi, David
kaust.personThompson, Luke R.
kaust.personAntunes, Andre
kaust.personCahill, Matthew


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