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dc.contributor.authorPuglisi, Edoardo
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Matt J.
dc.contributor.authorLessard, Philip A.
dc.contributor.authorCapri, Ettore
dc.contributor.authorSinskey, Anthony John
dc.contributor.authorArcher, John A.C.
dc.contributor.authorBoccazzi, Paolo
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:13:58Z
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:13:58Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-06
dc.identifier.issn00953628
dc.identifier.pmid20369357
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-010-9650-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561549
dc.description.abstractWe used a microarray targeting 3,524 genes to assess the transcriptional response of the actinomycete Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24 in minimal medium supplemented with various substrates (e. g., PCBs) and in both PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated sediment slurries. Relative to the reference condition (minimal medium supplemented with glucose), 408 genes were upregulated in the various treatments. In medium and in sediment, PCBs elicited the upregulation of a common set of 100 genes, including gene-encoding chaperones (groEL), a superoxide dismutase (sodA), alkyl hydroperoxide reductase protein C (ahpC), and a catalase/peroxidase (katG). Analysis of the R. aetherivorans I24 genome sequence identified orthologs of many of the genes in the canonical biphenyl pathway, but very few of these genes were upregulated in response to PCBs or biphenyl. This study is one of the first to use microarrays to assess the transcriptional response of a soil bacterium to a pollutant under conditions that more closely resemble the natural environment. Our results indicate that the transcriptional response of R. aetherivorans I24 to PCBs, in both medium and sediment, is primarily directed towards reducing oxidative stress, rather than catabolism. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by IRG Marie Curie Grant "COMEHERE," contract No. 21634, and by the Cambridge-MIT Institute.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.titleTranscriptional Response of Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24 to Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Contaminated Sediments
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
dc.identifier.journalMicrobial Ecology
dc.contributor.institutionIstituto di Chimica Agraria ed Ambientale, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza, Italy
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. 68-370A, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EH, United Kingdom
kaust.personArcher, John A.C.
dc.date.published-online2010-04-06
dc.date.published-print2010-10


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