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dc.contributor.authorPlett, Darren
dc.contributor.authorBaumann, Ute
dc.contributor.authorSchreiber, Andreas W.
dc.contributor.authorHoltham, Luke
dc.contributor.authorKalashyan, Elena
dc.contributor.authorToubia, John
dc.contributor.authorNau, John
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Mary
dc.contributor.authorRafalski, Antoni
dc.contributor.authorDhugga, Kanwarpal S.
dc.contributor.authorTester, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorGarnett, Trevor
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Brent N.
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-03T08:35:55Z
dc.date.available2015-06-03T08:35:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-02
dc.identifier.citationMaize maintains growth in response to decreased nitrate supply through a highly dynamic and developmental stage-specific transcriptional response 2015:n/a Plant Biotechnology Journal
dc.identifier.issn14677644
dc.identifier.pmid26038196
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pbi.12388
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/556195
dc.description.abstractElucidation of the gene networks underlying the response to N supply and demand will facilitate the improvement of the N uptake efficiency of plants. We undertook a transcriptomic analysis of maize to identify genes responding to both a non-growth-limiting decrease in NO3- provision and to development-based N demand changes at seven representative points across the life cycle. Gene co-expression networks were derived by cluster analysis of the transcript profiles. The majority of NO3--responsive transcription occurred at 11 (D11), 18 (D18) and 29 (D29) days after emergence, with differential expression predominating in the root at D11 and D29 and in the leaf at D18. A cluster of 98 probe sets was identified, the expression pattern of which is similar to that of the high-affinity NO3- transporter (NRT2) genes across the life cycle. The cluster is enriched with genes encoding enzymes and proteins of lipid metabolism and transport, respectively. These are candidate genes for the response of maize to N supply and demand. Only a few patterns of differential gene expression were observed over the entire life cycle; however, the composition of the classes of the genes differentially regulated at individual time points was unique, suggesting tightly controlled regulation of NO3--responsive gene expression. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/pbi.12388
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Plett, D., Baumann, U., Schreiber, A.W., Holtham, L., Kalashyan, E., Toubia, J., Nau, J., Beatty, M., Rafalski, A., Dhugga, K.S., Tester, M., Garnett, T. and Kaiser, B.N. (2015) Maize maintains growth in response to decreased nitrate supply through a highly dynamic and developmental stage-specific transcriptional response. Plant Biotechnol. J., doi: 10.1111/pbi.12388, which has been published in final form at http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/pbi.12388. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
dc.subjectN use efficiency
dc.subjecthigh-affinity nitrate transporter
dc.subjectNRT2
dc.subjectmicroarray
dc.subjectgene cluster analysis
dc.subjectlipid metabolism
dc.titleMaize maintains growth in response to decreased nitrate supply through a highly dynamic and developmental stage-specific transcriptional response
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentDesert Agriculture Initiative
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Science
dc.identifier.journalPlant Biotechnology Journal
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionDuPont Pioneer; Johnston IA USA
dc.contributor.institutionDuPont Pioneer; Johnston IA USA
dc.contributor.institutionDuPont Pioneer; Wilmington DE USA
dc.contributor.institutionDuPont Pioneer; Johnston IA USA
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Agriculture, Food and Wine; Waite Research Institute; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA Australia
dc.contributor.institutionACRF South Australian Cancer Genomics Facility, Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Molecular and Biomedical Science, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionThe Plant Accelerator, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Carbon Water and Food, The Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, The University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australia
kaust.personTester, Mark A.
refterms.dateFOA2016-06-02T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2015-06-02
dc.date.published-print2016-01


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