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dc.contributor.authorHoward, Meredith D. A.
dc.contributor.authorSutula, Martha
dc.contributor.authorCaron, David A.
dc.contributor.authorChao, Yi
dc.contributor.authorFarrara, John D.
dc.contributor.authorFrenzel, Hartmut
dc.contributor.authorJones, Burton
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, George
dc.contributor.authorMcLaughlin, Karen
dc.contributor.authorSengupta, Ashmita
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-21T06:33:01Z
dc.date.available2015-05-21T06:33:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-26
dc.identifier.citationAnthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight 2014, 59 (1):285 Limnology and Oceanography
dc.identifier.issn00243590
dc.identifier.doi10.4319/lo.2014.59.1.0285
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/554357
dc.description.abstractAnthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.4319/lo.2014.59.1.0285
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Limnology and Oceanography
dc.titleAnthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalLimnology and Oceanography
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionSouthern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, California
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
dc.contributor.institutionJoint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
dc.contributor.institutionOrange County Sanitation District, Fountain Valley, California
dc.contributor.institutionRemote Sensing Solutions, Pasadena, California
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Washington, Seattle, Washington
kaust.personJones, Burton
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T06:37:49Z
dc.date.published-online2014-01-26
dc.date.published-print2014-01


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