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dc.contributor.authorRoder, Cornelia
dc.contributor.authorArif, Chatchanit
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, Camille Arian
dc.contributor.authorWeil, E.
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-11T14:28:42Z
dc.date.available2014-11-11T14:28:42Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-29
dc.identifier.citationRoder C, Arif C, Daniels C, Weil E, Voolstra CR (2014) Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease across corals and oceans indicates a conserved and distinct disease microbiome. Molecular Ecology 23: 965-974. doi:10.1111/mec.12638.
dc.identifier.issn09621083
dc.identifier.pmid24350609
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.12638
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/334532
dc.description.abstractCoral diseases are characterized by microbial community shifts in coral mucus and tissue, but causes and consequences of these changes are vaguely understood due to the complexity and dynamics of coral-associated bacteria. We used 16S rRNA gene microarrays to assay differences in bacterial assemblages of healthy and diseased colonies displaying White Plague Disease (WPD) signs from two closely related Caribbean coral species, Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella franksi. Analysis of differentially abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed strong differences between healthy and diseased specimens, but not between coral species. A subsequent comparison to data from two Indo-Pacific coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) revealed distinct microbial community patterns associated with ocean basin, coral species and health state. Coral species were clearly separated by site, but also, the relatedness of the underlying bacterial community structures resembled the phylogenetic relationship of the coral hosts. In diseased samples, bacterial richness increased and putatively opportunistic bacteria were consistently more abundant highlighting the role of opportunistic conditions in structuring microbial community patterns during disease. Our comparative analysis shows that it is possible to derive conserved bacterial footprints of diseased coral holobionts that might help in identifying key bacterial species related to the underlying etiopathology. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that similar-appearing disease phenotypes produce microbial community patterns that are consistent over coral species and oceans, irrespective of the putative underlying pathogen. Consequently, profiling coral diseases by microbial community structure over multiple coral species might allow the development of a comparative disease framework that can inform on cause and relatedness of coral diseases. 2013 The Authors Molecular Ecology John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Molecular Ecology
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subject16S rRNA gene microarray
dc.subjectcoral disease
dc.subjectmicrobial community
dc.subjectOrbicella faveolata
dc.subjectOrbicella franksi
dc.subjectPavona duerdeni
dc.subjectPorites lutea
dc.subjectWhite Plague Disease (WPD)
dc.subjectWhite Plague-like Disease
dc.subjectWhite Syndrome (WS)
dc.subjectbacterial DNA
dc.subjectRNA 16S
dc.subjectAnthozoa
dc.subjectbacterium
dc.subjectCentral America
dc.subjectclassification
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjectmicrobiology
dc.subjectmicroflora
dc.subjectphylogeny
dc.subjectBacteria
dc.subjectCaribbean Region
dc.subjectDNA, Bacterial
dc.subjectMicrobiota
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectRNA, Ribosomal, 16S
dc.titleBacterial profiling of White Plague Disease across corals and oceans indicates a conserved and distinct disease microbiome
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentReef Genomics Lab
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Ecology
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4285310
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO BOX 9000, Mayaguez PR 00680, United States
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personRoder, Cornelia
kaust.personArif, Chatchanit
kaust.personDaniels, Camille Arian
kaust.personVoolstra, Christian R.
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T15:45:15Z
dc.date.published-online2014-01-29
dc.date.published-print2014-02


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.