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dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.
dc.contributor.authorAfonso, Pedro
dc.contributor.authorFontes, Jorge
dc.contributor.authorBraun, Camrin D.
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Ricardo S.
dc.contributor.authorSkomal, Gregory B.
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:48:31Z
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:48:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-01
dc.identifier.citationThorrold SR, Afonso P, Fontes J, Braun CD, Santos RS, et al. (2014) Extreme diving behaviour in devil rays links surface waters and the deep ocean. Nature Communications 5. doi:10.1038/ncomms5274.
dc.identifier.issn20411723
dc.identifier.pmid24983949
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms5274
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325347
dc.description.abstractEcological connections between surface waters and the deep ocean remain poorly studied despite the high biomass of fishes and squids residing at depths beyond the euphotic zone. These animals likely support pelagic food webs containing a suite of predators that include commercially important fishes and marine mammals. Here we deploy pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags on 15 Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) in the central North Atlantic Ocean, which provide movement patterns of individuals for up to 9 months. Devil rays were considered surface dwellers but our data reveal individuals descending at speeds up to 6.0 ms-1 to depths of almost 2,000 m and water temperatures <4 C. The shape of the dive profiles suggests that the rays are foraging at these depths in deep scattering layers. Our results provide evidence of an important link between predators in the surface ocean and forage species occupying pelagic habitats below the euphotic zone in ocean ecosystems. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.titleExtreme diving behaviour in devil rays links surface waters and the deep ocean
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalNature Communications
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4102113
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, United States
dc.contributor.institutionIMAR (Institute of Marine Research), University of the Azores, Department of Oceanography and Fisheries, Horta 9901-862, Portugal
dc.contributor.institutionLARSyS - Laboratory of Robotics and Systems in Engineering and Science, Lisboa 1049-001, Portugal
dc.contributor.institutionMassachusetts Marine Fisheries, 1213 Purchase Street, New Bedford, MA 02740, United States
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personBraun, Camrin D.
kaust.personBerumen, Michael L.
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T15:16:11Z


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/