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dc.contributor.authorHoey, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorPratchett, Morgan S.
dc.contributor.authorCvitanovic, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:45:31Z
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:45:31Z
dc.date.issued2011-10-03
dc.identifier.citationHoey AS, Pratchett MS, Cvitanovic C (2011) High Macroalgal Cover and Low Coral Recruitment Undermines the Potential Resilience of the World-s Southernmost Coral Reef Assemblages. PLoS ONE 6: e25824. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0025824.
dc.identifier.issn19326203
dc.identifier.pmid21991366
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0025824
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325295
dc.description.abstractCoral reefs are under increasing pressure from anthropogenic and climate-induced stressors. The ability of reefs to reassemble and regenerate after disturbances (i.e., resilience) is largely dependent on the capacity of herbivores to prevent macroalgal expansion, and the replenishment of coral populations through larval recruitment. Currently there is a paucity of this information for higher latitude, subtropical reefs. To assess the potential resilience of the benthic reef assemblages of Lord Howe Island (31°32?S, 159°04?E), the worlds' southernmost coral reef, we quantified the benthic composition, densities of juvenile corals (as a proxy for coral recruitment), and herbivorous fish communities. Despite some variation among habitats and sites, benthic communities were dominated by live scleractinian corals (mean cover 37.4%) and fleshy macroalgae (20.9%). Live coral cover was higher than in most other subtropical reefs and directly comparable to lower latitude tropical reefs. Juvenile coral densities (0.8 ind.m -2), however, were 5-200 times lower than those reported for tropical reefs. Overall, macroalgal cover was negatively related to the cover of live coral and the density of juvenile corals, but displayed no relationship with herbivorous fish biomass. The biomass of herbivorous fishes was relatively low (204 kg.ha -1), and in marked contrast to tropical reefs was dominated by macroalgal browsing species (84.1%) with relatively few grazing species. Despite their extremely low biomass, grazing fishes were positively related to both the density of juvenile corals and the cover of bare substrata, suggesting that they may enhance the recruitment of corals through the provision of suitable settlement sites. Although Lord Howe Islands' reefs are currently coral-dominated, the high macroalgal cover, coupled with limited coral recruitment and low coral growth rates suggest these reefs may be extremely susceptible to future disturbances. © 2011 Hoey et al.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.rightsHoey et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS ONE
dc.subjectbenthos
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectcoral
dc.subjectcoral reef
dc.subjectfish
dc.subjectgrazing
dc.subjecthabitat
dc.subjectherbivore
dc.subjectlatitude
dc.subjectmacroalga
dc.subjectAnthozoa
dc.subjectaquatic species
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectgeography
dc.subjectgrowth, development and aging
dc.subjectherbivory
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectprincipal component analysis
dc.subjectseaweed
dc.subjectAnthozoa
dc.subjectPisces
dc.subjectScleractinia
dc.subjectAnthozoa
dc.subjectAquatic Organisms
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectBiomass
dc.subjectCoral Reefs
dc.subjectFishes
dc.subjectGeography
dc.subjectHerbivory
dc.subjectPrincipal Component Analysis
dc.subjectSeaweed
dc.titleHigh macroalgal cover and low coral recruitment undermines the potential resilience of the world's southernmost coral reef assemblages
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONE
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3185058
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
kaust.personHoey, Andrew
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T14:50:20Z


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