Now showing items 1-20 of 20111

    • Natal philopatry increases relatedness within groups of coral reef cardinalfish

      Rueger, Theresa; Harrison, Hugo B.; Buston, Peter M.; Gardiner, Naomi M.; Berumen, Michael L.; Jones, G. P. (Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, The Royal Society, 2020-07-08) [Article]
      A central issue in evolutionary ecology is how patterns of dispersal influence patterns of relatedness in populations. In terrestrial organisms, limited dispersal of offspring leads to groups of related individuals. By contrast, for most marine organisms, larval dispersal in open waters is thought to minimize kin associations within populations. However, recent molecular evidence and theoretical approaches have shown that limited dispersal, sibling cohesion and/or differential reproductive success can lead to kin association and elevated relatedness. Here, we tested the hypothesis that limited dispersal explains small-scale patterns of relatedness in the pajama cardinalfish Sphaeramia nematoptera. We used 19 microsatellite markers to assess parentage of 233 juveniles and pairwise relatedness among 527 individuals from 41 groups in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. Our findings support three predictions of the limited dispersal hypothesis: (i) elevated relatedness within groups, compared with among groups and elevated relatedness within reefs compared with among reefs; (ii) a weak negative correlation of relatedness with distance; (iii) more juveniles than would be expected by chance in the same group and the same reef as their parents. We provide the first example for natal philopatry at the group level causing small-scale patterns of genetic relatedness in a marine fish.
    • Interaction of Dust Aerosols with Land/Sea Breezes over the Eastern Coast of the Red Sea from LIDAR Data and High-resolution WRF-Chem Simulations

      Parajuli, Sagar P.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Ukhov, Alexander; Shevchenko, Illia; Dubovik, Oleg; Lopatin, Anton (Submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, Copernicus GmbH, 2020-07-08) [Preprint]
      With advances in modeling approaches and the application of satellite and ground-based data in dust-related research, our understanding of the dust cycle has significantly improved in recent decades. However, two aspects of the dust cycle, namely the vertical profiles and diurnal cycles, are not yet adequately understood, mainly due to the sparsity of direct observations. Measurements of backscattering caused by atmospheric aerosols have been ongoing since 2014 at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) campus using a micro-pulse LIDAR with a high temporal resolution. KAUST is located on the east coast of the Red Sea (22.3° N, 39.1° E), and currently hosts the only operating LIDAR system in the Arabian Peninsula. We use the data from this LIDAR together with other collocated observations and high-resolution WRF-Chem model simulations to study the following aspects of aerosols, with a focus on dust over the Red Sea Arabian coastal plains. Firstly, we investigate the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and concentration in terms of their seasonal and diurnal variability. Secondly, we evaluate how well the WRF-Chem model performs in representing the vertical distribution of aerosols over the study site. Thirdly, we explore the interactions between dust aerosols and land/sea breezes, which are the most influential components of the local diurnal circulation in the region. We found a substantial variation in the vertical profile of aerosols in different seasons. We also discovered a marked difference in the daytime and nighttime vertical distribution of aerosols at the study site, as revealed by the LIDAR data. The LIDAR data also identified a prominent dust layer at ∼5–7 km during the nighttime, which represented the long-range transported dust brought to the site by the easterly flow from remote inland deserts. The vertical profiles of aerosol extinction in different seasons were largely consistent between the LIDAR, MERRA-2 reanalysis, and CALIOP data, as well as in the WRF-Chem simulations. The sea breeze circulation was much deeper (∼2 km) than the land breeze circulation (∼1 km), but both breeze systems prominently affected the distribution of dust aerosols over the study site. We observed that sea breezes push the dust aerosols upwards along the western slope of the Sarawat Mountains, which eventually collide with the dust-laden northeasterly trade winds coming from nearby inland deserts, causing elevated dust maxima at a height of ∼1.5 km above sea level over the mountains. Moreover, the sea and land breezes intensified dust emissions from the coastal region during the daytime and nighttime, respectively. The WRF-Chem model successfully captured the onset, demise, and height of a large-scale dust event that occurred in 2015, compared to LIDAR data. Our study, although focused on a particular region, has broader environmental implications as it highlights how aerosols and dust emissions from the coastal plains can affect the Red Sea climate and marine habitats.
    • Chemoselective Hydrogenation of Alkynes to (Z)-Alkenes Using an Air-Stable Base Metal Catalyst

      Zubar, Viktoriia; Sklyaruk, Jan; Brzozowska, Aleksandra; Rueping, Magnus (Organic Letters, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2020-07-08) [Article]
      A highly selective hydrogenation of alkynes using an air-stable and readily available manganese catalyst has been achieved. The reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions and tolerates various functional groups, resulting in (Z)-alkenes and allylic alcohols in high yields. Mechanistic experiments suggest that the reaction proceeds via a bifunctional activation involving metal–ligand cooperativity.
    • Seagrass losses since mid-20th century fuelled CO 2 emissions from soil carbon stocks

      Salinas, Cristian; Duarte, Carlos M.; Lavery, P. S.; Masqué, Pere; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Leon, Javier X.; Callaghan, David; Kendrick, G. A.; Serrano, Oscar (Global Change Biology, Wiley, 2020-07-07) [Article]
      Seagrass meadows store globally significant organic carbon (Corg) stocks which, if disturbed, can lead to CO2 emissions, contributing to climate change. Eutrophication and thermal stress continue to be a major cause of seagrass decline worldwide, but the associated CO2 emissions remain poorly understood. This study presents comprehensive estimates of seagrass soil Corg erosion following eutrophication-driven seagrass loss in Cockburn Sound (23 km2 between 1960s and 1990s) and identifies the main drivers. We estimate that shallow seagrass meadows (<5 m depth) had significantly higher Corg stocks in 50 cm thick soils (4.5 ± 0.7 kg Corg/m2) than previously vegetated counterparts (0.5 ± 0.1 kg Corg/m2). In deeper areas (>5 m), however, soil Corg stocks in seagrass and bare but previously vegetated areas were not significantly different (2.6 ± 0.3 and 3.0 ± 0.6 kg Corg/m2, respectively). The soil Corg sequestration capacity prevailed in shallow and deep vegetated areas (55 ± 11 and 21 ± 7 g Corg m−2 year−1, respectively), but was lost in bare areas. We identified that seagrass canopy loss alone does not necessarily drive changes in soil Corg but, when combined with high hydrodynamic energy, significant erosion occurred. Our estimates point at ~0.20 m/s as the critical shear velocity threshold causing soil Corg erosion. We estimate, from field studies and satellite imagery, that soil Corg erosion (within the top 50 cm) following seagrass loss likely resulted in cumulative emissions of 0.06–0.14 Tg CO2-eq over the last 40 years in Cockburn Sound. We estimated that indirect impacts (i.e. eutrophication, thermal stress and light stress) causing the loss of ~161,150 ha of seagrasses in Australia, likely resulted in the release of 11–21 Tg CO2-eq since the 1950s, increasing cumulative CO2 emissions from land-use change in Australia by 1.1%–2.3% per annum. The patterns described serve as a baseline to estimate potential CO2 emissions following disturbance of seagrass meadows.
    • SARS-CoV-2 infections and COVID-19 mortalities strongly correlate with ACE1 I/D genotype.

      Yamamoto, Naoki; Ariumi, Yasuo; Nishida, Nao; Yamamoto, Rain; Bauer, Georg; Gojobori, Takashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Mizokami, Masashi (Gene, Elsevier BV, 2020-07-07) [Article]
      Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The relentless spread and pathogenicity of the virus have become a global public health emergency. One of the striking features of this pandemic is the pronounced impact on specific regions and ethnic groups. In particular, compared with East Asia, where the virus first emerged, SARS-CoV-2 has caused high rates of morbidity and mortality in Europe. This has not been experienced in past global viral infections, such as influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and is unique to SARS-CoV-2. For this reason, we investigated the involvement of genetic factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection with a focus on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-related genes, because ACE2 is a receptor for SARS-CoV-2. We found that the ACE1 II genotype frequency in a population was significantly negatively correlated with the number of SARS-CoV-2 cases. Similarly, the ACE1 II genotype was negatively correlated with the number of deaths due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. These data suggest that the ACE1 II genotype may influence the prevalence and clinical outcome of COVID-19 and serve as a predictive marker for COVID-19 risk and severity.
    • Videos with results from the paper "Multi-objective risk-aware path planning in uncertain transient currents: an ensemble-based stochastic optimization approach." by Albarakati S., Lima R.M., Theußl T., Hoteit I., Knio O

      Albarakati, Sultan; Lima, Ricardo; Theussl, Thomas; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar (2020-07-06) [Video]
      Videos with results from the paper "Multi-objective risk-aware path planning in uncertain transient currents: an ensemble-based stochastic optimization approach." by Albarakati S., Lima R.M., Theußl T., Hoteit I., Knio O
    • Videos with results from the paper "Optimal 3D trajectory planning for AUVs using ocean general circulation models" by Albarakati S., Lima R.M., Giraldi L., Hoteit I., Knio O.

      Albarakati, Sultan; Lima, Ricardo; Giraldi, Loic (2020-07-06) [Video]
      Albarakati S., Lima R.M., Giraldi L., Hoteit I., Knio O., 2019. Optimal 3D trajectory planning for AUVs using ocean general circulation models. Ocean Engineering 188.
    • Semiparametric estimation of cross-covariance functions for multivariate random fields

      Qadir, Ghulam A.; Sun, Ying (Biometrics, Wiley, 2020-07-06) [Article]
      The prevalence of spatially referenced multivariate data has impelled researchers to develop procedures for joint modeling of multiple spatial processes. This ordinarily involves modeling marginal and cross-process dependence for any arbitrary pair of locations using a multivariate spatial covariance function. However, building a flexible multivariate spatial covariance function that is nonnegative definite is challenging. Here, we propose a semiparametric approach for multivariate spatial covariance function estimation with approximate Matérn marginals and highly flexible cross-covariance functions via their spectral representations. The flexibility in our cross-covariance function arises due to B-spline based specification of the underlying coherence functions, which in turn allows us to capture non-trivial cross-spectral features. We then develop a likelihood-based estimation procedure and perform multiple simulation studies to demonstrate the performance of our method, especially on the coherence function estimation. Finally, we analyze particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5) and wind speed data over the West-North-Central climatic region of the United States, where we illustrate that our proposed method outperforms the commonly used full bivariate Matérn model and the linear model of coregionalization for spatial prediction.
    • Videos with results from the paper "Optimal 3D time-energy trajectory planning for AUVs using ocean general circulation models" by Albarakati S., Lima R.M., Theußl T., Hoteit I., Knio O

      Albarakati, Sultan; Lima, Ricardo; Theussl, Thomas; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar (2020-07-06) [Video]
      Videos with results from the paper "Optimal 3D time-energy trajectory planning for AUVs using ocean general circulation models" by Albarakati S., Lima R.M., Theußl T., Hoteit I., Knio O
    • Expression of a carotenogenic gene allows faster biomass production by redesigning plant architecture and improving photosynthetic efficiency in tobacco.

      Moreno, Juan C; Mi, Jianing; Agrawal, Shreya; Kössler, Stella; Turečková, Veronika; Tarkowská, Danuše; Thiele, Wolfram; Al-Babili, Salim; Bock, Ralph; Schöttler, Mark Aurel (The Plant journal : for cell and molecular biology, Wiley, 2020-07-06) [Article]
      Because carotenoids act as accessory pigments in photosynthesis, play a key photoprotective role, and are of major nutritional importance, carotenogenesis has been a target for crop improvement. Although carotenoids are important precursors of phytohormones, previous genetic manipulations reported little if any effects on biomass production and plant development, but resulted in specific modifications in carotenoid content. Unexpectedly, the expression of the carrot lycopene b-cyclase (DcLCYB1) in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi not only resulted in increased carotenoid accumulation, but also in altered plant architecture characterized by longer internodes, faster plant growth, early flowering and increased biomass. Here, we have challenged these transformants with a range of growth conditions to determine the robustness of their phenotype and analyze the underlying mechanisms. Transgenic DcLCYB1 lines showed increased transcript levels of key genes involved in carotenoid, chlorophyll, gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, but also in photosynthesis-related genes. Accordingly, their carotenoid, chlorophyll, ABA and GA contents were increased. Hormone application and inhibitor experiments confirmed the key role of altered GA/ABA contents in the growth phenotype. Because the longer internodes reduce shading of mature leaves, induction of leaf senescence was delayed, and mature leaves maintained a high photosynthetic capacity. This increased total plant assimilation, as reflected in higher plant yields under both fully-controlled constant and fluctuating light, and in non-controlled conditions. Furthermore, our data is a warning that engineering of isoprenoid metabolism can cause complex changes in phytohormone homeostasis and therefore plant development, which have not been sufficiently considered in previous studies.
    • Unfamiliar partnerships limit cnidarian holobiont acclimation to warming

      Herrera Sarrias, Marcela; Klein, Shannon; Schmidt-Roach, Sebastian; Campana, Sara; Cziesielski, Maha Joana; Chen, Jit Ern; Duarte, Carlos M.; Aranda, Manuel (Global Change Biology, Wiley, 2020-07-06) [Article]
      Enhancing the resilience of corals to rising temperatures is now a matter of urgency, leading to growing efforts to explore the use of heat tolerant symbiont species to improve their thermal resilience. The notion that adaptive traits can be retained by transferring the symbionts alone, however, challenges the holobiont concept, a fundamental paradigm in coral research. Holobiont traits are products of a specific community (holobiont) and all its co-evolutionary and local adaptations, which might limit the retention or transference of holobiont traits by exchanging only one partner. Here, we evaluate how interchanging partners affect the short- and long-term performance of holobionts under heat stress using clonal lineages of the cnidarian model system Aiptasia (host and Symbiodiniaceae strains) originating from distinct thermal environments. Our results show that holobionts from more thermally variable environments have higher plasticity to heat stress, but this resilience could not be transferred to other host genotypes through the exchange of symbionts. Importantly, our findings highlight the role of the host in determining holobiont productivity in response to thermal stress and indicate that local adaptations of holobionts will likely limit the efficacy of interchanging unfamiliar compartments to enhance thermal tolerance.
    • Numerical Study of CH4 Generation and Transport in XLPE-Insulated Cables in Continuous Vulcanization

      Ruslan, Mohd Fuad Anwari Che; Youn, Dong Joon; Aarons, Roshan; Sun, Yabin; Sun, Shuyu (Materials, MDPI AG, 2020-07-06) [Article]
      <jats:p>In this work, we apply a computational diffusion model based on Fick’s laws to study the generation and transport of methane (CH 4 ) during the production of a cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulated cable. The model takes into account the heating process in a curing tube where most of the cross-linking reaction occurs and the subsequent two-stage cooling process, with water and air as the cooling media. For the calculation of CH 4 generation, the model considers the effect of temperature on the cross-linking reaction selectivity. The cross-linking reaction selectivity is a measure of the preference of cumyloxy to proceed either with a hydrogen abstraction reaction, which produces cumyl alcohol, or with a β -scission reaction, which produces acetophenone and CH 4 . The simulation results show that, during cable production, a significant amount of CH 4 is generated in the XLPE layer, which diffuses out of the cable and into the conductor part of the cable. Therefore, the diffusion pattern becomes a non-uniform radial distribution of CH 4 at the cable take-up point, which corresponds well with existing experimental data. Using the model, we perform a series of parametric studies to determine the effect of the cable production conditions, such as the curing temperature, line speed, and cooling water flow rate, on CH 4 generation and transport during cable production. The results show that the curing temperature has the largest impact on the amount of CH 4 generated and its distribution within the cable. We found that under similar curing and cooling conditions, varying the line speed induces a notable effect on the CH 4 transport within the cable, while the cooling water flow rate had no significant impact.</jats:p>
    • Semiparametric estimation of cross-covariance functions for multivariate random fields

      Qadir, Ghulam A.; Sun, Ying (Biometrics, Wiley, 2020-07-06) [Article]
      The prevalence of spatially referenced multivariate data has impelled researchers to develop procedures for joint modeling of multiple spatial processes. This ordinarily involves modeling marginal and cross-process dependence for any arbitrary pair of locations using a multivariate spatial covariance function. However, building a flexible multivariate spatial covariance function that is nonnegative definite is challenging. Here, we propose a semiparametric approach for multivariate spatial covariance function estimation with approximate Matérn marginals and highly flexible cross-covariance functions via their spectral representations. The flexibility in our cross-covariance function arises due to B-spline based specification of the underlying coherence functions, which in turn allows us to capture non-trivial cross-spectral features. We then develop a likelihood-based estimation procedure and perform multiple simulation studies to demonstrate the performance of our method, especially on the coherence function estimation. Finally, we analyze particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5) and wind speed data over the West-North-Central climatic region of the United States, where we illustrate that our proposed method outperforms the commonly used full bivariate Matérn model and the linear model of coregionalization for spatial prediction.
    • Solution-processable and photopolymerisable TiO2 nanorods as dielectric layers for thin film transistors

      Cheng, Fei; Verrelli, Emanuele; Alharthi, Fahad A.; Das, Satyajit; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Lai, Khue T.; Kemp, Neil T.; O'Neill, Mary; Kelly, Stephen M. (RSC Advances, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), 2020-07-06) [Article]
      <p>A prototype solution-processed n-type thin film transistor was fabricated. The film incorporates a dielectric layer prepared from solution-processed and photopolymerised inorganic/organic TiO$_{2}$ nanorods and zinc oxide as the semiconductor, also deposited from solution.</p>
    • Biofouling control by phosphorus limitation strongly depends on the assimilable organic carbon concentration.

      Javier, Luisa; Farhat, Nadia M; Desmond, Peter; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Bucs,Szilard; Kruithof, Joop C; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. (Water research, Elsevier BV, 2020-07-05) [Article]
      Nutrient limitation is a biofouling control strategy in reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In seawater, the assimilable organic carbon content available for bacterial growth ranges from about 50 to 400 μg C·L-1, while the phosphorus concentration ranges from 3 to 11 μg P·L-1. Several studies monitored biofouling development, limiting either carbon or phosphorus. The effect of carbon to phosphorus ratio and the restriction of both nutrients on membrane system performance have not yet been investigated. This study examines the impact of reduced phosphorus concentration (from 25 μg P·L-1 and 3 μg P·L-1, to a low concentration of ≤0.3 μg P·L-1), combined with two different carbon concentrations (250 C L-1 and 30 μg C·L-1), on biofilm development in an RO system. Feed channel pressure drop was measured to determine the effect of the developed biofilm on system performance. The morphology of the accumulated biomass for both carbon concentrations was characterized by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the biomass amount and composition was quantified by measuring total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), total cell counts (TCC), and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentration for the developed biofilms under phosphorus restricted (P-restricted) and dosed (P-dosed) conditions. For both carbon concentrations, P-restricted conditions (≤0.3 μg P·L-1) limited bacterial growth (lower values of ATP, TCC). A faster pressure drop increase was observed for P-restricted conditions compared to P-dosed conditions when 250 μg C·L-1 was dosed. This faster pressure drop increase can be explained by a higher area covered by biofilm in the flow channel and a higher amount of produced EPS. Conversely, a slower pressure drop increase was observed for P-restricted conditions compared to P-dosed conditions when 30 μg C·L-1 was dosed. Results of this study demonstrate that P-limitation delayed biofilm formation effectively when combined with low assimilable organic carbon concentration and thereby, lengthening the overall membrane system performance.
    • Effect of organic micropollutants on biofouling in a forward osmosis process integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation

      Kim,Youngjin; Kim, Lan Hee; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Ghaffour, NorEddine (Journal of Hazardous Materials, Elsevier BV, 2020-07-04) [Article]
      This study systematically investigated the effect of organic micropollutants (OMPs) on biofouling in forward osmosis (FO) integrating wastewater treatment and seawater dilution. Synthetic seawater (0.6 M sodium chloride) was used as a draw solution and synthetic municipal wastewater as a feed solution. To evaluate the impact of OMPs in a replicate parallel study, wastewater was supplemented with a mixture of 7 OMPs (OMPs-feed) and without OMPs (control) during 8 batch filtration cycles with feed and draw solution replacement after each filtration. The FO performance (water flux), development and microbial composition properties of biofilm layers on the wastewater side of the FO membrane were studied. Compared to the control without OMPs, the FO fed with OMPs containing wastewater showed (i) initially the same water flux and flux decline during the first filtration cycle, (ii) with increasing filtration cycle a lower flux decline and (iii) lower concentrations for the total cells, ATP, EPS carbohydrates and proteins in biofilm layers, and (iv) a lower diversity of the biofilm microbial community composition (indicating selective pressure) and (v) increasing rejection of 6 of the 7 OMPs. In essence, biofouling on the FO membrane showed (i) a lower flux decline in the presence of OMPs in the feed water and (ii) a higher OMPs rejection, both illustrating better membrane performance. This study has a significant implication for optimizing osmotic dilution in terms of FO operation and OMPs rejection.
    • Autoignition of diethyl ether and a diethyl ether/ethanol blend

      Issayev, Gani; Sarathy, Mani; Farooq, Aamir (Fuel, Elsevier BV, 2020-07-04) [Article]
      Binary blends of fast-reacting diethyl ether (DEE) and slow-reacting ethanol (EtOH) are quite promising as renewable replacements for conventional fuels in modern compression ignition engines. In this work, pure diethyl ether and a 50/50 M binary blend of diethyl ether and ethanol (DEE/EtOH) were investigated in a shock tube and a rapid compression machine. Ignition delay times were measured over the temperature range of 550–1000 K, pressures of 20–40 bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5–1. Literature reaction mechanisms of diethyl ether and ethanol were combined to simulate the reactivity trends of the blends. Species rate-of-production and sensitivity analyses were performed to analyze the interplay between radicals originating from the two fuels. Multistage ignition behavior was observed in both experiments and simulations, with peculiar 3-stage ignition visible at fuel-lean conditions. Kinetic analyses were used to identify the reactions controlling various stages of ignition. Reactivity comparison of DEE/EtOH and dimethyl ether/ethanol (DME/EtOH) blends showed that the oxidation of DEE blends is controlled by acetaldehyde whereas formaldehyde controls the oxidation of DME blends.
    • Unrealistic energy and materials requirement for direct air capture in deep mitigation pathways

      Chatterjee, Sudipta; Huang, Kuo-Wei (Nature Communications, Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-07-03) [Article]
      The increasing global atmospheric CO2 concentration due to heavy reliance on fossil fuels as the primary energy sources (~410 ppm in 2019)1 has made direct extraction or removal of CO2 from ambient air (direct air carbon capture (DACC)) the most logical alternative over traditional modes of carbon capture from large stationary sources because of many of the perceived advantages and compelling arguments2. With the current level of CO2 emissions (32.6 gigatons (Gt)-CO2/year2017)1, Realmonte and co-workers recently imposed the global capacity at 30 Gt-CO2/year as a case study for DACC, and concluded that “in theory DACCS can be an enabling factor for the Paris Agreement objectives” and recommended the policy makers to “support an acceleration in development and deployment of DACCS”3. While challenges of large-scale CO2 utilization and sequestration were recognized and these approaches were deemed impractical4,5, our analysis further showed that the energy and materials requirements for DACC are unrealistic even when the most promising technologies are employed. Thus, DACC is unfortunately only an energetically and financially costly distraction in effective mitigation of climate changes at a meaningful scale before we achieve the status of a significant surplus of carbon-neutral/low-carbon energy.
    • Bioconversion of swine manure into high-value products of medium chain fatty acids.

      Zhang, Wanqin; Yin, Fubin; Dong, Hongmin; Cao, Qitao; Wang, Shunli; Xu, Jiajie; Zhu, Zhiping (Waste management (New York, N.Y.), Elsevier BV, 2020-07-03) [Article]
      This research proposes and demonstrates, for the first time, the utilization of swine manure as a complex feedstock to produce high-value medium chain fatty acids (MCFA). The two-stage anaerobic digestion (AD) carboxylates platform was adopted for the conversion of swine manure to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and then SCFAs to MCFA (n-caproate, n-heptanoate, and n-caprylate) with ethanol supplementation. We defined the appropriate initial pH of 10.0 for SCFAs production with a carbon conversion rate of 71.2%, and acetate, propionate were the main products, which accounted for around 72.9% of the total SCFAs in the primary stage (I). Through the addition of ethanol, 61.3% of the converted carbon in the complex SCFAs solution was converted into MCFA (C6-C8) in the chain elongation stage (II), while only 6.7% was attributed to methane formation. The concentrations of n-caproate, n-heptanoate, and n-caprylate reached 8.6 g COD/L (3.9 g/L), 6.4 g COD/L (2.7 g/L), and 2.6 g COD/L (1.07 g/L), respectively. This study achieved a relatively higher concentration of n-heptanoate compared with past studies of MCFA from other feedstock. These findings demonstrated a new route for resource recovery and the operating parameters for producing MCFA from swine manure.
    • A Highly Conductive Titanium Oxynitride Electron-Selective Contact for Efficient Photovoltaic Devices.

      Yang, Xinbo; Lin, Yuanbao; Liu, Jiang; Liu, Wenzhu; Bi, Qunyu; Song, Xin; Kang, Jingxuan; Xu, Fuzong; Xu, Lujia; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Baran, Derya; Zhang, Xiaohong; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; De Wolf, Stefaan (Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), Wiley, 2020-07-03) [Article]
      High-quality carrier-selective contacts with suitable electronic properties are a prerequisite for photovoltaic devices with high power conversion efficiency (PCE). In this work, an efficient electron-selective contact, titanium oxynitride (TiOx Ny ), is developed for crystalline silicon (c-Si) and organic photovoltaic devices. Atomic-layer-deposited TiOx Ny is demonstrated to be highly conductive with a proper work function (4.3 eV) and a wide bandgap (3.4 eV). Thin TiOx Ny films simultaneously provide a moderate surface passivation and enable a low contact resistivity on c-Si surfaces. By implementation of an optimal TiOx Ny -based contact, a state-of-the-art PCE of 22.3% is achieved for a c-Si solar cell featuring a full-area dopant-free electron-selective contact. Simultaneously, conductive TiOx Ny is proven to be an efficient electron-transport layer for organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A remarkably high PCE of 17.02% is achieved for an OPV device with an electron-transport TiOx Ny layer, which is superior to conventional ZnO-based devices with a PCE of 16.10%. Atomic-layer-deposited TiOx Ny ETL on a large area with a high uniformity may help accelerate the commercialization of emerging solar technologies.