Controlled Release and Delivery Laboratory

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 69
  • Article

    Chick chorioallantoic membrane assay as an in vivo model to study the effect of nanoparticle-based anticancer drugs in ovarian cancer

    (Springer Nature, 2018-06-04) Vu, Binh Thanh; Shahin, Sophia Allaf; Croissant, Jonas G.; Fatieiev, Yevhen; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Le-Hoang Doan, Tan; Yik, Tammy; Simargi, Shirleen; Conteras, Altagracia; Ratliff, Laura; Jimenez, Chiara Mauriello; Raehm, Laurence; Khashab, Niveen M.; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Glackin, Carlotta; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Chemical Science Program; Investment Fund; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Smart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab; Laboratory for Stem Cell Research and Application, Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Department of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, City of Hope-Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA, USA; Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, Advanced Materials Laboratory, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Center for Innovative Materials and Architectures, Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR-5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Montpellier, France

    New therapy development is critically needed for ovarian cancer. We used the chicken egg CAM assay to evaluate efficacy of anticancer drug delivery using recently developed biodegradable PMO (periodic mesoporous organosilica) nanoparticles. Human ovarian cancer cells were transplanted onto the CAM membrane of fertilized eggs, resulting in rapid tumor formation. The tumor closely resembles cancer patient tumor and contains extracellular matrix as well as stromal cells and extensive vasculature. PMO nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin were injected intravenously into the chicken egg resulting in elimination of the tumor. No significant damage to various organs in the chicken embryo occurred. In contrast, injection of free doxorubicin caused widespread organ damage, even when less amount was administered. The lack of toxic effect of nanoparticle loaded doxorubicin was associated with specific delivery of doxorubicin to the tumor. Furthermore, we observed excellent tumor accumulation of the nanoparticles. Lastly, a tumor could be established in the egg using tumor samples from ovarian cancer patients and that our nanoparticles were effective in eliminating the tumor. These results point to the remarkable efficacy of our nanoparticle based drug delivery system and suggests the value of the chicken egg tumor model for testing novel therapies for ovarian cancer.

  • Article

    Cooperative Assembly of Magneto-Nanovesicles with Tunable Wall Thickness and Permeability for MRI-Guided Drug Delivery

    (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018-03-15) Yang, Kuikun; Liu, Yijing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Kong, Chuncai; Yi, Chenglin; Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Zhantong; Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yang; Khashab, Niveen M.; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Chemical Science Program; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Smart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742, United States; Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health, Maryland 20892, United States; Liu, Yijing

    This article describes the fabrication of nanosized magneto-vesicles (MVs) comprising tunable layers of densely packed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in membranes via cooperative assembly of polymer-tethered SPIONs and free poly(styrene)- b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b-PAA). The membrane thickness of MVs could be well controlled from 9.8 to 93.2 nm by varying the weight ratio of PS- b-PAA to SPIONs. The increase in membrane thickness was accompanied by the transition from monolayer MVs, to double-layered MVs and to multilayered MVs (MuMVs). This can be attributed to the variation in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of polymer-grafted SPIONs upon the insertion and binding of PS- b-PAA onto the surface of nanoparticles. Therapeutic agents can be efficiently encapsulated in the hollow cavity of MVs and the release of payload can be tuned by varying the membrane thickness of nanovesicles. Due to the high packing density of SPIONs, the MuMVs showed the highest magnetization and transverse relaxivity rate ( r2) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among these MVs and individual SPIONs. Upon intravenous injection, doxorubicin-loaded MuMVs conjugated with RGD peptides could be effectively enriched at tumor sites due to synergetic effect of magnetic and active targeting. As a result, they exhibited drastically enhanced signal in MRI, improved tumor delivery efficiency of drugs as well as enhanced antitumor efficacy, compared with groups with only magnetic or active targeting strategy. The unique nanoplatform may find applications in effective disease control by delivering imaging and therapy to organs/tissues that are not readily accessible by conventional delivery vehicles.

  • Article

    Physical Removal of Anions from Aqueous Media by Means of a Macrocycle-Containing Polymeric Network

    (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018-02-19) Ji, Xiaofan; Wu, Ren-Tsung; Long, Lingliang; Guo, Chenxing; Khashab, Niveen M.; Huang, Feihe; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Chemical Science Program; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Smart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab; Department of Chemistry, 105 East 24th Street, Stop A5300, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, United States; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013, P. R. China; State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Center for Chemistry of High-Performance & Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P. R. China; Center for Supramolecular Chemistry and Catalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China

    Reported here is a hydrogel-forming polymer network that contains a water-soluble tetracationic macrocycle. Upon immersion of this polymer network in aqueous solutions containing various inorganic and organic salts, changes in the physical properties are observed that are consistent with absorption of the constituent anions into the polymer network. This absorption is ascribed to host-guest interactions involving the tetracationic macrocyclic receptor. Removal of the anions may then be achieved by lifting the resulting hydrogels out of the aqueous phase. Treating the anion-containing hydrogels with dilute HCl leads to the protonation-induced release of the bound anions. This allows the hydrogels to be recycled for reuse. The present polymer network thus provides a potentially attractive approach to removing undesired anions from aqueous environments.

  • Article

    Mesoporous Silica and Organosilica Nanoparticles: Physical Chemistry, Biosafety, Delivery Strategies, and Biomedical Applications

    (Wiley, 2017-11-30) Croissant, Jonas G.; Fatieiev, Yevhen; Almalik, Abdulaziz; Khashab, Niveen M.; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Chemical Science Program; Investment Fund; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Smart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab; Center for Micro-Engineered Materials; Advanced Materials Laboratory; University of New Mexico; MSC04 2790, 1001 University Blvd SE Suite 103 Albuquerque NM 87106 USA; Chemical and Biological Engineering; University of New Mexico; 210 University Blvd NE Albuquerque NM 87131-0001 USA; Life sciences and Environment Research Institute; Center of Excellence in Nanomedicine (CENM); King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST); Riyadh 11461 Saudi Arabia

    Predetermining the physico-chemical properties, biosafety, and stimuli-responsiveness of nanomaterials in biological environments is essential for safe and effective biomedical applications. At the forefront of biomedical research, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles are increasingly investigated to predict their biological outcome by materials design. In this review, it is first chronicled that how the nanomaterial design of pure silica, partially hybridized organosilica, and fully hybridized organosilica (periodic mesoporous organosilicas) governs not only the physico-chemical properties but also the biosafety of the nanoparticles. The impact of the hybridization on the biocompatibility, protein corona, biodistribution, biodegradability, and clearance of the silica-based particles is described. Then, the influence of the surface engineering, the framework hybridization, as well as the morphology of the particles, on the ability to load and controllably deliver drugs under internal biological stimuli (e.g., pH, redox, enzymes) and external noninvasive stimuli (e.g., light, magnetic, ultrasound) are presented. To conclude, trends in the biomedical applications of silica and organosilica nanovectors are delineated, such as unconventional bioimaging techniques, large cargo delivery, combination therapy, gaseous molecule delivery, antimicrobial protection, and Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  • Article

    Endosomal Escape and Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Machinery Enabled by Nanoscale Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework

    (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2017-12-27) Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Patil, Sachin; Alyami, Mram Z.; Alamoudi, Kholod; Aleisa, Fajr A; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Li, Mo; Khashab, Niveen M.; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Chemical Science Program; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Smart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a combined protein (Cas9) and an engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) genome editing platform that offers revolutionary solutions to genetic diseases. It has, however, a double delivery problem owning to the large protein size and the highly charged RNA component. In this work, we report the first example of CRISPR/Cas9 encapsulated by nanoscale zeolitic imidazole frameworks (ZIFs) with a loading efficiency of 17% and enhanced endosomal escape promoted by the protonated imidazole moieties. The gene editing potential of CRISPR/Cas9 encapsulated by ZIF-8 (CC-ZIFs) is further verified by knocking down the gene expression of green fluorescent protein by 37% over 4 days employing CRISPR/Cas9 machinery. The nanoscale CC-ZIFs are biocompatible and easily scaled-up offering excellent loading capacity and controlled co-delivery of intact Cas9 protein and sgRNA.