Plant Science Program

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 187
  • Article

    Metal–Organic Framework-Mediated Delivery of Nucleic Acid across Intact Plant Cells

    (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2024-04-02) Yu, Pei; Zheng, Xiongjie; Alimi, Lukman Olawale; Al-Babili, Salim; Khashab, Niveen M.; Smart Hybrid Materials Laboratory (SHMs), Chemistry Program, Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia; Chemistry; Chemical Science Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Biological, Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division; Plant Science; Center for Desert Agriculture; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Center; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Plant Science Program

    Plant synthetic biology is applied in sustainable agriculture, clean energy, and biopharmaceuticals, addressing crop improvement, pest resistance, and plant-based vaccine production by introducing exogenous genes into plants. This technique faces challenges delivering genes due to plant cell walls and intact cell membranes. Novel approaches are required to address this challenge, such as utilizing nanomaterials known for their efficiency and biocompatibility in gene delivery. This work investigates metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) for gene delivery in intact plant cells by infiltration. Hence, small-sized ZIF-8 nanoparticles (below 20 nm) were synthesized and demonstrated effective DNA/RNA delivery into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and Arabidopsis thaliana roots, presenting a promising and simplified method for gene delivery in intact plant cells. We further demonstrate that small-sized ZIF-8 nanoparticles protect RNA from RNase degradation and successfully silence an endogenous gene by delivering siRNA in N. benthamiana leaves.

  • Article

    Metal–Organic Framework-Mediated Delivery of Nucleic Acid across Intact Plant Cells

    (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2024-04-02) Yu, Pei; Zheng, Xiongjie; Alimi, Lukman Olawale; Al-Babili, Salim; Khashab, Niveen M.; Smart Hybrid Materials Laboratory (SHMs), Chemistry Program, Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia; Chemistry; Chemical Science Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering; Physical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division; Biological, Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division; Plant Science; Center for Desert Agriculture; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Center; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Plant Science Program

    Plant synthetic biology is applied in sustainable agriculture, clean energy, and biopharmaceuticals, addressing crop improvement, pest resistance, and plant-based vaccine production by introducing exogenous genes into plants. This technique faces challenges delivering genes due to plant cell walls and intact cell membranes. Novel approaches are required to address this challenge, such as utilizing nanomaterials known for their efficiency and biocompatibility in gene delivery. This work investigates metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) for gene delivery in intact plant cells by infiltration. Hence, small-sized ZIF-8 nanoparticles (below 20 nm) were synthesized and demonstrated effective DNA/RNA delivery into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and Arabidopsis thaliana roots, presenting a promising and simplified method for gene delivery in intact plant cells. We further demonstrate that small-sized ZIF-8 nanoparticles protect RNA from RNase degradation and successfully silence an endogenous gene by delivering siRNA in N. benthamiana leaves.

  • Article

    Distinguishing the functions of canonical strigolactones as rhizospheric signals

    (Elsevier BV, 2024-03) Wang, Jian You; Chen, Guan-Ting Erica; Braguy, Justine; Al-Babili, Salim; The Plant Science Program, Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Bioscience; Bioscience Program; Biological, Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division; Plant Science; Center for Desert Agriculture; Plant Science Program

    Strigolactones (SLs) act as regulators of plant architecture as well as signals in rhizospheric communications. Reduced availability of minerals, particularly phosphorus, leads to an increase in the formation and release of SLs that enable adaptation of root and shoot architecture to nutrient limitation and, simultaneously, attract arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for establishing beneficial symbiosis. Based on their chemical structure, SLs are designated as either canonical or non-canonical; however, the question of whether the two classes are also distinguished in their biological functions remained largely elusive until recently. In this review we summarize the latest advances in SL biosynthesis and highlight new findings pointing to rhizospheric signaling as the major function of canonical SLs.

  • Article

    Strigolactone biosynthesis in rice can occur via a 9-cis-3-OH-10′-apo-β-carotenal intermediate

    (Wiley, 2024-01-01) Wang, Jian You; Chen, Guan Ting Erica; Balakrishna, Aparna; Jamil, Muhammad; Berqdar, Lamis; Al-Babili, Salim; The Plant Science Program, Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia; Bioscience Program; Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division; Plant Science; Center for Desert Agriculture; Plant Science Program

    Strigolactones (SLs) play a crucial role in regulating plant architecture and mediating rhizosphere interactions. They are synthesized from all-trans-β-carotene converted into the intermediate carlactone (CL) via the intermediate 9-cis-β-apo-10′-carotenal. Recent studies indicate that plants can also synthesize 3-OH-CL from all-trans-β-zeaxanthin via the intermediate 9-cis-3-OH-β-apo-10′-carotenal. However, the question of whether plants can form bioactive SLs from 9-cis-3-OH-β-apo-10′-carotenal remains elusive. In this study, we supplied the 13C-labeled 9-cis-3-OH-β-apo-10′-carotenal to rice seedlings and monitored the synthesis of SLs using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC–MS) and Striga bioassay. We further validated the biological activity of 9-cis-3-OH-β-apo-10′-carotenal-derived SLs using the ccd7/d17 SL-deficient mutant, which demonstrated increased Striga seed-germinating activity and partial rescue of tiller numbers and plant height. Our results establish 9-cis-3-OH-β-apo-10′-carotenal as a significant SL biosynthetic intermediate with implications for understanding plant hormonal functions and potential applications in agriculture.

  • Article

    Disruption of the rice 4-DEOXYOROBANCHOL HYDROXYLASE unravels specific functions of canonical strigolactones.

    (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2023-10-11) Chen, Guan-Ting Erica; Wang, Jian You; Votta, Cristina; Braguy, Justine; Jamil, Muhammad; Kirschner, Gwendolyn Kristin; Fiorilli, Valentina; Berqdar, Lamis; Balakrishna, Aparna; Blilou, Ikram; Lanfranco, Luisa; Al-Babili, Salim; The Plant Science Program, Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division, Plant Cell and Developmental Biology, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia; Bioscience Program; Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division; Plant Science; Center for Desert Agriculture; Plant Science Program; Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy

    Strigolactones (SLs) regulate many developmental processes, including shoot-branching/tillering, and mediate rhizospheric interactions. SLs originate from carlactone (CL) and are structurally diverse, divided into a canonical and a noncanonical subfamily. Rice contains two canonical SLs, 4-deoxyorobanchol (4DO) and orobanchol (Oro), which are common in different plant species. The cytochrome P450 OsMAX1-900 forms 4DO from CL through repeated oxygenation and ring closure, while the homologous enzyme OsMAX1-1400 hydroxylates 4DO into Oro. To better understand the biological function of 4DO and Oro, we generated CRISPR/Cas9 mutants disrupted in OsMAX1-1400 or in both OsMAX1-900 and OsMAX1-1400. The loss of OsMAX1-1400 activity led to a complete lack of Oro and an accumulation of its precursor 4DO. Moreover, Os1400 mutants showed shorter plant height, panicle and panicle base length, but no tillering phenotype. Hormone quantification and transcriptome analysis of Os1400 mutants revealed elevated auxin levels and changes in the expression of auxin-related, as well as of SL biosynthetic genes. Interestingly, the Os900/1400 double mutant lacking both Oro and 4DO did not show the observed Os1400 architectural phenotypes, indicating their being a result of 4DO accumulation. Treatment of wild-type plants with 4DO confirmed this assumption. A comparison of the Striga seed germinating activity and the mycorrhization of Os900, Os900/1400, and Os1400 loss-of-function mutants demonstrated that the germination activity positively correlates with 4DO content while disrupting OsMAX1-1400 has a negative impact on mycorrhizal symbiosis. Taken together, our paper deciphers the biological function of canonical SLs in rice and reveals their particular contributions to establishing architecture and rhizospheric communications.