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  • Characterizing envelopes of moving rotational cones and applications in CNC machining

    Skopenkov, Mikhail; Bo, Pengbo; Bartoň, Michael; Pottmann, Helmut (Elsevier, 2020-10-20) [Article]
    Motivated by applications in CNC machining, we provide a characterization of surfaces which are enveloped by a one-parametric family of congruent rotational cones. As limit cases, we also address developable surfaces and ruled surfaces. The characterizations are higher order nonlinear PDEs generalizing the ones by Gauss and Monge for developable surfaces and ruled surfaces, respectively. The derivation includes results on local approximations of a surface by cones of revolution, which are expressed by contact order in the space of planes. These results are themselves of interest in geometric computing, for example in cutter selection and positioning for flank CNC machining.
  • Learning from Scholarly Attributed Graphs for Scientific Discovery

    Akujuobi, Uchenna Thankgod (2020-10-18) [Dissertation]
    Advisor: Zhang, Xiangliang
    Committee members: Moshkov, Mikhail; Hoehndorf, Robert; Zhang, Min
    Research and experimentation in various scientific fields are based on the knowledge and ideas from scholarly literature. The advancement of research and development has, thus, strengthened the importance of literary analysis and understanding. However, in recent years, researchers have been facing massive scholarly documents published at an exponentially increasing rate. Analyzing this vast number of publications is far beyond the capability of individual researchers. This dissertation is motivated by the need for large scale analyses of the exploding number of scholarly literature for scientific knowledge discovery. In the first part of this dissertation, the interdependencies between scholarly literature are studied. First, I develop Delve – a data-driven search engine supported by our designed semi-supervised edge classification method. This system enables users to search and analyze the relationship between datasets and scholarly literature. Based on the Delve system, I propose to study information extraction as a node classification problem in attributed networks. Specifically, if we can learn the research topics of documents (nodes in a network), we can aggregate documents by topics and retrieve information specific to each topic (e.g., top-k popular datasets). Node classification in attributed networks has several challenges: a limited number of labeled nodes, effective fusion of topological structure and node/edge attributes, and the co-existence of multiple labels for one node. Existing node classification approaches can only address or partially address a few of these challenges. This dissertation addresses these challenges by proposing semi-supervised multi-class/multi-label node classification models to integrate node/edge attributes and topological relationships. The second part of this dissertation examines the problem of analyzing the interdependencies between terms in scholarly literature. I present two algorithms for the automatic hypothesis generation (HG) problem, which refers to the discovery of meaningful implicit connections between scientific terms, including but not limited to diseases, drugs, and genes extracted from databases of biomedical publications. The automatic hypothesis generation problem is modeled as a future connectivity prediction in a dynamic attributed graph. The key is to capture the temporal evolution of node-pair (term-pair) relations. Experiment results and case study analyses highlight the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms compared to the baselines’ extension.
  • Dynamic Programming Multi-Objective Combinatorial Optimization

    Mankowski, Michal (2020-10-18) [Dissertation]
    Advisor: Moshkov, Mikhail
    Committee members: Keyes, David E.; Shihada, Basem; Boros, Endre
    In this dissertation, we consider extensions of dynamic programming for combinatorial optimization. We introduce two exact multi-objective optimization algorithms: the multi-stage optimization algorithm that optimizes the problem relative to the ordered sequence of objectives (lexicographic optimization) and the bi-criteria optimization algorithm that simultaneously optimizes the problem relative to two objectives (Pareto optimization). We also introduce a counting algorithm to count optimal solution before and after every optimization stage of multi-stage optimization. We propose a fairly universal approach based on so-called circuits without repetitions in which each element is generated exactly one time. Such circuits represent the sets of elements under consideration (the sets of feasible solutions) and are used by counting, multi-stage, and bi-criteria optimization algorithms. For a given optimization problem, we should describe an appropriate circuit and cost functions. Then, we can use the designed algorithms for which we already have proofs of their correctness and ways to evaluate the required number of operations and the time. We construct conventional (which work directly with elements) circuits without repetitions for matrix chain multiplication, global sequence alignment, optimal paths in directed graphs, binary search trees, convex polygon triangulation, line breaking (text justi cation), one-dimensional clustering, optimal bitonic tour, and segmented least squares. For these problems, we evaluate the number of operations and the time required by the optimization and counting algorithms, and consider the results of computational experiments. If we cannot nd a conventional circuit without repetitions for a problem, we can either create custom algorithms for optimization and counting from scratch or can transform a circuit with repetitions into a so-called syntactical circuit, which is a circuit without repetitions that works not with elements but with formulas representing these elements. We apply both approaches to the optimization of matchings in trees and apply the second approach to the 0/1 knapsack problem. We also brie y introduce our work in operation research with applications to health care. This work extends our interest in the optimization eld from developing new methods included in this dissertation towards the practical application.
  • Impact of osmotic and thermal isolation barrier on concentration and temperature polarization and energy efficiency in a novel FO-MD integrated module

    Son, Hyuk Soo; Kim, Youngjin; Nawaz, Muhammad Saqib; Al-Hajji, Mohammed Ali; Abu-Ghdaib, Muhannad; Soukane, Sofiane; Ghaffour, NorEddine (Journal of Membrane Science, Elsevier BV, 2020-10-18) [Article]
    In this study, a novel integrated forward osmosis - membrane distillation (FO-MD) module equipped with an isolation barrier carefully placed between the FO and MD membranes is experimentally investigated, and its performance is compared with a conventional hybrid module. The function of the isolation barrier is to osmotically and thermally separate the FO draw solution (DS) and MD feed channels. A systematic approach is adopted to compare the flux through both modules under (i) different and similar hydrodynamic conditions, (ii) different DS concentrations and temperatures, and (iii) different feed solution concentrations. All experiments were performed for 9 h each in batch mode using a custom-made compact module. New FO and MD membrane sheets were mounted for each experiment to ensure similarity in operating conditions. The proposed module design increased the flux by 22.1% using the same module dimensions but different hydrodynamic conditions. The flux increased by 16.6% using the same hydrodynamic conditions but different module dimensions. The FO/MD energy ratio reduced from 0.89 to 0.64 for the novel module, indicating better utilization of energy (primarily from MD). The gain output ratio (GOR) increased on average by 15.8% for the novel module compared to the conventional module, with a maximum increment of 20.7%. The temperature and concentration polarization coefficients in the MD operations showed improvements of 17.4% and 2.6%, respectively. The presence of the isolation barrier inside the integrated module indicated promising improvements of the flux and internal heat recovery, and further significant enhancements are expected for larger scale modules. Additionally, the novel module design offers unprecedented process integration opportunities for FO-MD as well as other membrane hybrid systems.
  • High summer temperatures amplify functional differences between coral- and algae-dominated reef communities

    Roth, Florian; Rädecker, Nils; Carvalho, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.; Saderne, Vincent; Anton Gamazo, Andrea; Silva, Luis; Calleja Cortes, Maria de Lluch; Moran, Xose Anxelu G.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Kürten, Benjamin; Jones, Burton; Wild, Christian (Ecology, Wiley, 2020-10-17) [Article]
    Shifts from coral to algal dominance are expected to increase in tropical coral reefs as a result of anthropogenic disturbances. The consequences for key ecosystem functions such as primary productivity, calcification, and nutrient recycling are poorly understood, particularly under changing environmental conditions. We used a novel in situ incubation approach to compare functions of coral- and algae-dominated communities in the central Red Sea bi-monthly over an entire year. In situ gross and net community primary productivity, calcification, dissolved organic carbon fluxes, dissolved inorganic nitrogen fluxes, and their respective activation energies were quantified to describe the effects of seasonal changes. Overall, coral-dominated communities exhibited 30% lower net productivity and 10 times higher calcification than algae-dominated communities. Estimated activation energies indicated a higher thermal sensitivity of coral-dominated communities. In these communities, net productivity and calcification were negatively correlated with temperature (>40% and >65% reduction, respectively, with +5°C increase from winter to summer), while carbon losses via respiration and dissolved organic carbon release were more than doubled at higher temperatures. In contrast, algae-dominated communities doubled net productivity in summer, while calcification and dissolved organic carbon fluxes were unaffected. These results suggest pronounced changes in community functioning associated with phase shifts. Algae-dominated communities may outcompete coral-dominated communities due to their higher productivity and carbon retention to support fast biomass accumulation while compromising the formation of important reef framework structures. Higher temperatures likely amplify these functional differences, indicating a high vulnerability of ecosystem functions of coral-dominated communities to temperatures even below coral bleaching thresholds. Our results suggest that ocean warming may not only cause but also amplify coral-algal phase shifts in coral reefs.

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