Sonification of Animal Tracks as an Alternative Representation of Multi-Dimensional Data: A Northern Elephant Seal Example

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/627611
Title:
Sonification of Animal Tracks as an Alternative Representation of Multi-Dimensional Data: A Northern Elephant Seal Example
Authors:
Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 ) ; Riker, Paul W.; Srinivasan, Madhusudhanan; Robinson, Patrick W.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.; Costa, Daniel P.
Abstract:
Understanding movement of marine megafauna across the ocean is largely based on approaches and models based on analysis of tracks of single animals. While this has led to major progress, the possibility of concerted group dynamics has not been sufficiently examined, possibly due to challenges in exploring massive amounts of data required to this end. Here we report a sonification experiment, where the collective movement of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) was explored by coding their group dynamics into sound. Specifically, we converted into sound data derived from a tagging program involving a total of 321 tagged animals tracked over a decade, between 20 February 2004 and 30 May 2014, consisting of an observation period of 90,063 h, composed of 1,027,839 individual positions. The data parameters used to provide the sound are position (longitude) and spread (degree of displacement taken for the active group). These data parameters are mapped to the sonic parameters of frequency (pitch) and amplitude (volume), respectively. Examination of the resulting sound revealed features of motion that translate into specific patterns in space. The serial departure of elephant seals to initiate their trips into waves is clearly reflected in the addition of tonalities, with coherent swimming of the animals conforming a wave reflected in the modulated fluctuations in volume, suggesting coordinated fluctuations in dispersion of the wave. Smooth changes in volume, coordinated with pitch variability, indicate that the animals spread out as they move further away from the colony, with one or a few animals exploring an ocean area away from that explored by the core wave. The shift in volume and pitch also signals at group coordination in initiating the return home. Coordinated initiation of the return to the colony is also clearly revealed by the sonification, as reflected in an increase in volume and pitch of the notes denoting the movement of each animal in a migration wave. This sonification reveals clear patterns of covariation in movement data, which drivers and triggers, whether intrinsic or environmental, cannot be elucidated here but allow to formulate a number of non-trivial questions on the synchronized nature of group behavior of northern elephant seals foraging across the NE Pacific Ocean.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); KAUST Visualization Laboratory (KVL); Core Labs, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
Citation:
Duarte CM, Riker P, Srinivasan M, Robinson PW, Gallo-Reynoso JP, et al. (2018) Sonification of Animal Tracks as an Alternative Representation of Multi-Dimensional Data: A Northern Elephant Seal Example. Frontiers in Marine Science 5. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2018.00128.
Publisher:
Frontiers Media SA
Journal:
Frontiers in Marine Science
Issue Date:
20-Apr-2018
DOI:
10.3389/fmars.2018.00128
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2296-7745
Sponsors:
This research was conducted as part of the Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP) program and was supported in part by the National Ocean Partnership Program (N00014–02-1–1012); the Office of Naval Research (N00014–00-1-0880, N00014–03-1–0651, N00014–08-1–1195, the E&P Sound and Marine Life Joint Industry Project of the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (JIP2207–23); the University of California Natural Reserve System the Moore, Packard, and Sloan Foundations; and the Sooy Graduate Fellowship and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through the base-line fund to CD. This research also used resources of the Core Labs of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Additional Links:
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00128/full
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; KAUST Visualization Laboratory (KVL); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.authorRiker, Paul W.en
dc.contributor.authorSrinivasan, Madhusudhananen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Patrick W.en
dc.contributor.authorGallo-Reynoso, Juan P.en
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Daniel P.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-24T06:46:19Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-24T06:46:19Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-20en
dc.identifier.citationDuarte CM, Riker P, Srinivasan M, Robinson PW, Gallo-Reynoso JP, et al. (2018) Sonification of Animal Tracks as an Alternative Representation of Multi-Dimensional Data: A Northern Elephant Seal Example. Frontiers in Marine Science 5. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2018.00128.en
dc.identifier.issn2296-7745en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmars.2018.00128en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627611-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding movement of marine megafauna across the ocean is largely based on approaches and models based on analysis of tracks of single animals. While this has led to major progress, the possibility of concerted group dynamics has not been sufficiently examined, possibly due to challenges in exploring massive amounts of data required to this end. Here we report a sonification experiment, where the collective movement of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) was explored by coding their group dynamics into sound. Specifically, we converted into sound data derived from a tagging program involving a total of 321 tagged animals tracked over a decade, between 20 February 2004 and 30 May 2014, consisting of an observation period of 90,063 h, composed of 1,027,839 individual positions. The data parameters used to provide the sound are position (longitude) and spread (degree of displacement taken for the active group). These data parameters are mapped to the sonic parameters of frequency (pitch) and amplitude (volume), respectively. Examination of the resulting sound revealed features of motion that translate into specific patterns in space. The serial departure of elephant seals to initiate their trips into waves is clearly reflected in the addition of tonalities, with coherent swimming of the animals conforming a wave reflected in the modulated fluctuations in volume, suggesting coordinated fluctuations in dispersion of the wave. Smooth changes in volume, coordinated with pitch variability, indicate that the animals spread out as they move further away from the colony, with one or a few animals exploring an ocean area away from that explored by the core wave. The shift in volume and pitch also signals at group coordination in initiating the return home. Coordinated initiation of the return to the colony is also clearly revealed by the sonification, as reflected in an increase in volume and pitch of the notes denoting the movement of each animal in a migration wave. This sonification reveals clear patterns of covariation in movement data, which drivers and triggers, whether intrinsic or environmental, cannot be elucidated here but allow to formulate a number of non-trivial questions on the synchronized nature of group behavior of northern elephant seals foraging across the NE Pacific Ocean.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was conducted as part of the Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP) program and was supported in part by the National Ocean Partnership Program (N00014–02-1–1012); the Office of Naval Research (N00014–00-1-0880, N00014–03-1–0651, N00014–08-1–1195, the E&P Sound and Marine Life Joint Industry Project of the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (JIP2207–23); the University of California Natural Reserve System the Moore, Packard, and Sloan Foundations; and the Sooy Graduate Fellowship and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through the base-line fund to CD. This research also used resources of the Core Labs of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00128/fullen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleSonification of Animal Tracks as an Alternative Representation of Multi-Dimensional Data: A Northern Elephant Seal Exampleen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Visualization Laboratory (KVL)en
dc.contributor.departmentCore Labs, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Marine Scienceen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A. C., Hermosillo, Mexicoen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
kaust.authorRiker, Paul W.en
kaust.authorSrinivasan, Madhusudhananen
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