Foraging plasticity of breeding Northern Rockhopper Penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, in response to changing energy requirements

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/627482
Title:
Foraging plasticity of breeding Northern Rockhopper Penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, in response to changing energy requirements
Authors:
Booth, Jenny Marie; Steinfurth, Antje; Fusi, Marco ( 0000-0001-7433-2487 ) ; Cuthbert, Richard J.; McQuaid, Christopher D.
Abstract:
During the breeding season, seabirds must balance the changing demands of self- and off-spring provisioning with the constraints imposed by central-place foraging. Recently, it was shown that Northern Rockhopper Penguins at Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic Ocean switch diet from lower to higher trophic level prey throughout their breeding cycle. Here, we investigated if this switch is reflected in their foraging behaviour, using time-depth recorders to study the diving behaviour of 27 guard and 10 crèche birds during the breeding season 2010 at Tristan da Cunha and obtaining complementary stomach contents of 20 birds. While no significant effects of breeding stage were detected on any foraging trip or dive parameters, stage/prey had a significant effect on feeding dive parameters, with dive duration, bottom time, and maximum depth explaining the majority of the dissimilarity amongst categories. We verified the previously shown dietary shift from zooplankton and cephalopods during the guard stage to a higher-energy fish-based diet during the crèche stage, which was reflected in a change in dive behaviour from shorter, shallower to longer, deeper dives. This prey switching behaviour may reflect preferential selection to account for the increased physiological needs of chicks or simply mirror changes in local prey abundance. Nonetheless, we show that Northern Rockhopper Penguins demonstrate behavioural plasticity as a response to their changing energy requirements, which is a critical trait when living in a spatio-temporally heterogeneous environment. This ability is likely to be particularly important under extrinsic constraints such as long-term environmental change.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Booth JM, Steinfurth A, Fusi M, Cuthbert RJ, McQuaid CD (2018) Foraging plasticity of breeding Northern Rockhopper Penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, in response to changing energy requirements. Polar Biology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Polar Biology
Issue Date:
2-Apr-2018
DOI:
10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0722-4060; 1432-2056
Sponsors:
This work was carried out under the auspices of the Flagship Species Fund of the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and Fauna & Flora International with funding from DEFRA, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and other donors under Project FSF-Defra- 10-48. The Department of Environmental Affairs through the South African National Antarctic Programme and the Tristan da Cunha conservation department provided logistical support. Thanks to T. Glass, J. Repetto, G. Swain, C. Repetto, M. Green and K. Green of the Tristan Conservation Department for their support in the field. M. Connan and anonymous reviewers provided helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. This work is based upon research supported by the South African Research Chairs Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and the National Research Foundation. Funding was provided by SARCHI (Grant Number 64801).
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Jenny Marieen
dc.contributor.authorSteinfurth, Antjeen
dc.contributor.authorFusi, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorCuthbert, Richard J.en
dc.contributor.authorMcQuaid, Christopher D.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-16T11:20:29Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-16T11:20:29Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-02en
dc.identifier.citationBooth JM, Steinfurth A, Fusi M, Cuthbert RJ, McQuaid CD (2018) Foraging plasticity of breeding Northern Rockhopper Penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, in response to changing energy requirements. Polar Biology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6.en
dc.identifier.issn0722-4060en
dc.identifier.issn1432-2056en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627482-
dc.description.abstractDuring the breeding season, seabirds must balance the changing demands of self- and off-spring provisioning with the constraints imposed by central-place foraging. Recently, it was shown that Northern Rockhopper Penguins at Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic Ocean switch diet from lower to higher trophic level prey throughout their breeding cycle. Here, we investigated if this switch is reflected in their foraging behaviour, using time-depth recorders to study the diving behaviour of 27 guard and 10 crèche birds during the breeding season 2010 at Tristan da Cunha and obtaining complementary stomach contents of 20 birds. While no significant effects of breeding stage were detected on any foraging trip or dive parameters, stage/prey had a significant effect on feeding dive parameters, with dive duration, bottom time, and maximum depth explaining the majority of the dissimilarity amongst categories. We verified the previously shown dietary shift from zooplankton and cephalopods during the guard stage to a higher-energy fish-based diet during the crèche stage, which was reflected in a change in dive behaviour from shorter, shallower to longer, deeper dives. This prey switching behaviour may reflect preferential selection to account for the increased physiological needs of chicks or simply mirror changes in local prey abundance. Nonetheless, we show that Northern Rockhopper Penguins demonstrate behavioural plasticity as a response to their changing energy requirements, which is a critical trait when living in a spatio-temporally heterogeneous environment. This ability is likely to be particularly important under extrinsic constraints such as long-term environmental change.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was carried out under the auspices of the Flagship Species Fund of the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and Fauna & Flora International with funding from DEFRA, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and other donors under Project FSF-Defra- 10-48. The Department of Environmental Affairs through the South African National Antarctic Programme and the Tristan da Cunha conservation department provided logistical support. Thanks to T. Glass, J. Repetto, G. Swain, C. Repetto, M. Green and K. Green of the Tristan Conservation Department for their support in the field. M. Connan and anonymous reviewers provided helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. This work is based upon research supported by the South African Research Chairs Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and the National Research Foundation. Funding was provided by SARCHI (Grant Number 64801).en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6en
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00300-018-2321-6en
dc.subjectDietary shiften
dc.subjectEudyptes moseleyien
dc.subjectForaging plasticityen
dc.subjectGeneralisten
dc.subjectNorthern rockhopper penguinen
dc.subjectTristan da Cunhaen
dc.titleForaging plasticity of breeding Northern Rockhopper Penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, in response to changing energy requirementsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalPolar Biologyen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionCoastal Research Group, Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, , South Africaen
dc.contributor.institutionRSPB Centre for Conservation Science, David Attenborough Building, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, , United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionPercy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7700, , South Africaen
dc.contributor.institutionConservation Solutions, 9 Prospect Drive, Belper, Derbyshire, DE5 61UY, , United Kingdomen
kaust.authorBooth, Jenny Marieen
kaust.authorFusi, Marcoen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.