A marine heatwave drives massive losses from the world’s largest seagrass carbon stocks

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/627404
Title:
A marine heatwave drives massive losses from the world’s largest seagrass carbon stocks
Authors:
Arias-Ortiz, A. ( 0000-0001-9408-0061 ) ; Serrano, O. ( 0000-0002-5973-0046 ) ; Masqué, P. ( 0000-0002-1789-320X ) ; Lavery, P. S.; Mueller, U.; Kendrick, G. A. ( 0000-0002-0276-6064 ) ; Rozaimi, M. ( 0000-0001-6631-8677 ) ; Esteban, A.; Fourqurean, J. W. ( 0000-0002-0811-8500 ) ; Marbà, N.; Mateo, M. A.; Murray, K.; Rule, M. J.; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 )
Abstract:
Seagrass ecosystems contain globally significant organic carbon (C) stocks. However, climate change and increasing frequency of extreme events threaten their preservation. Shark Bay, Western Australia, has the largest C stock reported for a seagrass ecosystem, containing up to 1.3% of the total C stored within the top metre of seagrass sediments worldwide. On the basis of field studies and satellite imagery, we estimate that 36% of Shark Bay’s seagrass meadows were damaged following a marine heatwave in 2010/2011. Assuming that 10 to 50% of the seagrass sediment C stock was exposed to oxic conditions after disturbance, between 2 and 9 Tg CO could have been released to the atmosphere during the following three years, increasing emissions from land-use change in Australia by 4–21% per annum. With heatwaves predicted to increase with further climate warming, conservation of seagrass ecosystems is essential to avoid adverse feedbacks on the climate system.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Arias-Ortiz A, Serrano O, Masqué P, Lavery PS, Mueller U, et al. (2018) A marine heatwave drives massive losses from the world’s largest seagrass carbon stocks. Nature Climate Change 8: 338–344. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0096-y.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Nature Climate Change
Issue Date:
29-Mar-2018
DOI:
10.1038/s41558-018-0096-y
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1758-678X; 1758-6798
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the CSIRO Flagship Marine and Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster with funding from the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund and by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through the baseline funding to C.M.D., P.M. and A.A.-O., and M.A.M. acknowledge the support by the Generalitat de Catalunya (grants 2014 SGR-1356 and 2014 SGR-120, respectively). This work is contributing to the ICTA `Unit of Excellence' (MinECo, MDM2015-0552) and is contribution no. 78 from the Marine Education and Research Center at the Institute for Water and Environment at Florida International University. A.A.-O. was supported by a PhD scholarship from Obra Social `LaCaixa'. O.S. was supported by an ARC DECRA DE170101524. M.R. was supported by the Research University grant UKM-DIP-2017-005. N.M. was supported by a Gledden Visiting Fellowship of IAS-UWA and the Medshift project (CGL2015-71809-P) and J.W.F. was supported by the US National Science Foundation through the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research programme (grant DEB-1237517). Partial laboratory analysis was supported by the Hodgkin Trust Top-up Scholarship 2013 awarded to M.R. We thank G. Bufarale and L. Collins for their assistance in collecting the cores and C. X. Pita, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), for the artwork in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Fig. 1. Seagrass spatial distribution in Fig. 1 from the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions of Western Australia.
Additional Links:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0096-y
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArias-Ortiz, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, O.en
dc.contributor.authorMasqué, P.en
dc.contributor.authorLavery, P. S.en
dc.contributor.authorMueller, U.en
dc.contributor.authorKendrick, G. A.en
dc.contributor.authorRozaimi, M.en
dc.contributor.authorEsteban, A.en
dc.contributor.authorFourqurean, J. W.en
dc.contributor.authorMarbà, N.en
dc.contributor.authorMateo, M. A.en
dc.contributor.authorMurray, K.en
dc.contributor.authorRule, M. J.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-04T12:38:13Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-04T12:38:13Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-29en
dc.identifier.citationArias-Ortiz A, Serrano O, Masqué P, Lavery PS, Mueller U, et al. (2018) A marine heatwave drives massive losses from the world’s largest seagrass carbon stocks. Nature Climate Change 8: 338–344. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0096-y.en
dc.identifier.issn1758-678Xen
dc.identifier.issn1758-6798en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41558-018-0096-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627404-
dc.description.abstractSeagrass ecosystems contain globally significant organic carbon (C) stocks. However, climate change and increasing frequency of extreme events threaten their preservation. Shark Bay, Western Australia, has the largest C stock reported for a seagrass ecosystem, containing up to 1.3% of the total C stored within the top metre of seagrass sediments worldwide. On the basis of field studies and satellite imagery, we estimate that 36% of Shark Bay’s seagrass meadows were damaged following a marine heatwave in 2010/2011. Assuming that 10 to 50% of the seagrass sediment C stock was exposed to oxic conditions after disturbance, between 2 and 9 Tg CO could have been released to the atmosphere during the following three years, increasing emissions from land-use change in Australia by 4–21% per annum. With heatwaves predicted to increase with further climate warming, conservation of seagrass ecosystems is essential to avoid adverse feedbacks on the climate system.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the CSIRO Flagship Marine and Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster with funding from the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund and by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through the baseline funding to C.M.D., P.M. and A.A.-O., and M.A.M. acknowledge the support by the Generalitat de Catalunya (grants 2014 SGR-1356 and 2014 SGR-120, respectively). This work is contributing to the ICTA `Unit of Excellence' (MinECo, MDM2015-0552) and is contribution no. 78 from the Marine Education and Research Center at the Institute for Water and Environment at Florida International University. A.A.-O. was supported by a PhD scholarship from Obra Social `LaCaixa'. O.S. was supported by an ARC DECRA DE170101524. M.R. was supported by the Research University grant UKM-DIP-2017-005. N.M. was supported by a Gledden Visiting Fellowship of IAS-UWA and the Medshift project (CGL2015-71809-P) and J.W.F. was supported by the US National Science Foundation through the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research programme (grant DEB-1237517). Partial laboratory analysis was supported by the Hodgkin Trust Top-up Scholarship 2013 awarded to M.R. We thank G. Bufarale and L. Collins for their assistance in collecting the cores and C. X. Pita, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), for the artwork in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Fig. 1. Seagrass spatial distribution in Fig. 1 from the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions of Western Australia.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0096-yen
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0096-yen
dc.titleA marine heatwave drives massive losses from the world’s largest seagrass carbon stocksen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalNature Climate Changeen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals and Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, , , Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionThe University of Western Australia Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, , Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Science & Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, , Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre of Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, , Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionThe School of Biological Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, , Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM Bangi, Selangor, , Malaysiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences and Marine education and Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, , United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionGlobal Change Research Group, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Institut Mediterrani d’Estudis Avançats, Esporles, Mallorca, , Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, Kensington, WA, Australiaen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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