PyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulator

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/627356
Title:
PyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulator
Authors:
Garcia, D.; Ghommem, M.; Collier, N.; Varga, B.O.N.; Calo, V.M.
Abstract:
We present a fast, user-friendly implementation of a potential flow solver based on the unsteady vortex lattice method (UVLM), namely PyFly. UVLM computes the aerodynamic loads applied on lifting surfaces while capturing the unsteady effects such as the added mass forces, the growth of bound circulation, and the wake while assuming that the flow separation location is known a priori. This method is based on discretizing the body surface into a lattice of vortex rings and relies on the Biot–Savart law to construct the velocity field at every point in the simulated domain. We introduce the pointwise approximation approach to simulate the interactions of the far-field vortices to overcome the computational burden associated with the classical implementation of UVLM. The computational framework uses the Python programming language to provide an easy to handle user interface while the computational kernels are written in Fortran. The mixed language approach enables high performance regarding solution time and great flexibility concerning easiness of code adaptation to different system configurations and applications. The computational tool predicts the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of multiple moving bodies (e.g., flapping wings, rotating blades, suspension bridges) subject to incoming air. The aerodynamic simulator can also deal with enclosure effects, multi-body interactions, and B-spline representation of body shapes. We simulate different aerodynamic problems to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of PyFly.
KAUST Department:
Earth Science and Engineering Program
Citation:
Garcia D, Ghommem M, Collier N, Varga BON, Calo VM (2018) PyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulator. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cam.2018.03.003.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics
Issue Date:
18-Mar-2018
DOI:
10.1016/j.cam.2018.03.003
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0377-0427
Sponsors:
M. Ghommem’s work is partially supported by the American University of Sharjah faculty research grant (FRG-17-R-030).
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377042718301237
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Earth Science and Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, D.en
dc.contributor.authorGhommem, M.en
dc.contributor.authorCollier, N.en
dc.contributor.authorVarga, B.O.N.en
dc.contributor.authorCalo, V.M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T09:05:23Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-19T09:05:23Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-18en
dc.identifier.citationGarcia D, Ghommem M, Collier N, Varga BON, Calo VM (2018) PyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulator. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cam.2018.03.003.en
dc.identifier.issn0377-0427en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cam.2018.03.003en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627356-
dc.description.abstractWe present a fast, user-friendly implementation of a potential flow solver based on the unsteady vortex lattice method (UVLM), namely PyFly. UVLM computes the aerodynamic loads applied on lifting surfaces while capturing the unsteady effects such as the added mass forces, the growth of bound circulation, and the wake while assuming that the flow separation location is known a priori. This method is based on discretizing the body surface into a lattice of vortex rings and relies on the Biot–Savart law to construct the velocity field at every point in the simulated domain. We introduce the pointwise approximation approach to simulate the interactions of the far-field vortices to overcome the computational burden associated with the classical implementation of UVLM. The computational framework uses the Python programming language to provide an easy to handle user interface while the computational kernels are written in Fortran. The mixed language approach enables high performance regarding solution time and great flexibility concerning easiness of code adaptation to different system configurations and applications. The computational tool predicts the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of multiple moving bodies (e.g., flapping wings, rotating blades, suspension bridges) subject to incoming air. The aerodynamic simulator can also deal with enclosure effects, multi-body interactions, and B-spline representation of body shapes. We simulate different aerodynamic problems to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of PyFly.en
dc.description.sponsorshipM. Ghommem’s work is partially supported by the American University of Sharjah faculty research grant (FRG-17-R-030).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377042718301237en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 14 March 2018. DOI: 10.1016/j.cam.2018.03.003. © 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectUnsteady aerodynamicsen
dc.subjectNumerical simulationsen
dc.subjectMixed-language approachen
dc.subjectPotential flowen
dc.titlePyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulatoren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Computational and Applied Mathematicsen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionBasque Center for Applied Mathematics, (BCAM), Bilbao, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (AUS), Sharjah, United Arab Emiratesen
dc.contributor.institutionOak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionMineral Resources, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Kensington, WA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionApplied Geology Department, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australiaen
kaust.authorVarga, B.O.N.en
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