Application of monochloramine for wastewater reuse: Effect on biostability during transport and biofouling in RO membranes

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/627240
Title:
Application of monochloramine for wastewater reuse: Effect on biostability during transport and biofouling in RO membranes
Authors:
Farhat, Nadia ( 0000-0002-0588-8876 ) ; Loubineaud, E.; Prest, E.I.E.C.; El Chakhtoura, Joline; Salles, C.; Bucs, Szilard; Trampé, J.; Van den Broek, W.B.P.; Van Agtmaal, J.M.C.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Kruithof, J.C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
The rising demand for clean and safe water has increased the interest in advanced wastewater treatment and reuse. Reverse osmosis (RO) can provide reliable and high-quality water from treated wastewater. Biofouling inevitably occurs, certainly with wastewater effluents, resulting in RO performance decline and operational problems. Chlorination of feed water has been commonly applied to limit biological growth. However, chlorine use may lead to a loss of membrane integrity of RO systems. In this study the potential of monochloramine as an alternative for chlorine was studied by (i) evaluating the biological stability of a full-scale wastewater membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent during transport over 13 km to a full-scale RO plant and (ii) assessing the biofouling control potential in membrane fouling simulator (MFS) and pilot-scale RO installation. Microbial water analysis was performed on samples taken at several locations in the full-scale water reuse system (MBR effluent, during transport, and at the RO inlet and outlet) using a suite of tools including heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), flow cytometry (FCM), and 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Growth potential tests were used to evaluate the effect of monochloramine presence and absence on bacterial growth. Results showed limited changes in the microbial water quality in the presence of monochloramine. MFS studies showed that membrane biofouling could be effectively repressed by monochloramine over prolonged time periods. The normalized salt passage in a pilot RO system with monochloramine dosage was constant over a one year period (data of last 130 days presented), demonstrating that no membrane damage occurred. From this study, it can be concluded that monochloramine dosage in wastewater applications is effective in controlling biofouling in RO systems and maintaining a monochloramine residual during water transport provides biologically stable water.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Citation:
Farhat NM, Loubineaud E, Prest EIEC, El-Chakhtoura J, Salles C, et al. (2018) Application of monochloramine for wastewater reuse: Effect on biostability during transport and biofouling in RO membranes. Journal of Membrane Science 551: 243–253. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.memsci.2018.01.060.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Journal of Membrane Science
Issue Date:
23-Feb-2018
DOI:
10.1016/j.memsci.2018.01.060
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0376-7388
Sponsors:
The research reported in this publication was supported by funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Evides Industriewater.
Additional Links:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376738817327758
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFarhat, Nadiaen
dc.contributor.authorLoubineaud, E.en
dc.contributor.authorPrest, E.I.E.C.en
dc.contributor.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
dc.contributor.authorSalles, C.en
dc.contributor.authorBucs, Szilarden
dc.contributor.authorTrampé, J.en
dc.contributor.authorVan den Broek, W.B.P.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Agtmaal, J.M.C.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Loosdrecht, M.C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorKruithof, J.C.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-11T06:54:10Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-11T06:54:10Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-23en
dc.identifier.citationFarhat NM, Loubineaud E, Prest EIEC, El-Chakhtoura J, Salles C, et al. (2018) Application of monochloramine for wastewater reuse: Effect on biostability during transport and biofouling in RO membranes. Journal of Membrane Science 551: 243–253. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.memsci.2018.01.060.en
dc.identifier.issn0376-7388en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.memsci.2018.01.060en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627240-
dc.description.abstractThe rising demand for clean and safe water has increased the interest in advanced wastewater treatment and reuse. Reverse osmosis (RO) can provide reliable and high-quality water from treated wastewater. Biofouling inevitably occurs, certainly with wastewater effluents, resulting in RO performance decline and operational problems. Chlorination of feed water has been commonly applied to limit biological growth. However, chlorine use may lead to a loss of membrane integrity of RO systems. In this study the potential of monochloramine as an alternative for chlorine was studied by (i) evaluating the biological stability of a full-scale wastewater membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent during transport over 13 km to a full-scale RO plant and (ii) assessing the biofouling control potential in membrane fouling simulator (MFS) and pilot-scale RO installation. Microbial water analysis was performed on samples taken at several locations in the full-scale water reuse system (MBR effluent, during transport, and at the RO inlet and outlet) using a suite of tools including heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), flow cytometry (FCM), and 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Growth potential tests were used to evaluate the effect of monochloramine presence and absence on bacterial growth. Results showed limited changes in the microbial water quality in the presence of monochloramine. MFS studies showed that membrane biofouling could be effectively repressed by monochloramine over prolonged time periods. The normalized salt passage in a pilot RO system with monochloramine dosage was constant over a one year period (data of last 130 days presented), demonstrating that no membrane damage occurred. From this study, it can be concluded that monochloramine dosage in wastewater applications is effective in controlling biofouling in RO systems and maintaining a monochloramine residual during water transport provides biologically stable water.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this publication was supported by funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Evides Industriewater.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376738817327758en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Membrane Science. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Membrane Science, [551, , (2018-02-23)] DOI: 10.1016/j.memsci.2018.01.060 . © 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectBacterial communityen
dc.subjectFlow cytometryen
dc.subjectMembrane bioreactoren
dc.subjectPyrosequencingen
dc.subjectReverse osmosis performanceen
dc.subjectTransport pipeen
dc.titleApplication of monochloramine for wastewater reuse: Effect on biostability during transport and biofouling in RO membranesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Membrane Scienceen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDelft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Van der Maasweg 9, Delft, HZ, 2629, , Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionEvides Industriewater, PO Box 4472, Rotterdam, AL, 3006, , Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, European Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Oostergoweg 9, Leeuwarden, MA, 8911, , Netherlandsen
kaust.authorFarhat, Nadiaen
kaust.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
kaust.authorBucs, Szilarden
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
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