Copper current collectors reduce long-term fouling of air cathodes in microbial fuel cells

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/627115
Title:
Copper current collectors reduce long-term fouling of air cathodes in microbial fuel cells
Authors:
Myung, Jaewook; Yang, Wulin; Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 ) ; Logan, Bruce E
Abstract:
Long-term operation of wastewater-fed, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with cathodes made of activated carbon and stainless steel (SS) current collectors can result in decreased performance due to cathode fouling. Copper has good antimicrobial properties, and it is more electrically conductive than SS. To demonstrate that a copper current collector could produce a more fouling resistant cathode, MFCs with air cathodes using either SS or copper current collectors were operated using domestic wastewater for 27 weeks. The reduction in biofouling over time was shown by less biofilm formation on the copper cathode surface compared to SS cathodes, due to the antimicrobial properties of copper. Maximum power densities from 17–27 weeks were 440 ± 38 mW/m2 using copper and 370 ± 21 mW/m2 using SS cathodes. The main difference in the microbial community was a nitrifying community on the SS cathodes, which was not present on the copper cathodes.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Myung J, Yang W, Saikaly P, Logan BE (2018) Copper current collectors reduce long-term fouling of air cathodes in microbial fuel cells. Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7ew00518k.
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
Journal:
Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
Issue Date:
5-Feb-2018
DOI:
10.1039/c7ew00518k
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2053-1400; 2053-1419
Sponsors:
This research was funded by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program via cooperative research agreement W9132T-16-2-0014 with the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center.
Additional Links:
http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2018/EW/C7EW00518K#!divAbstract
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMyung, Jaewooken
dc.contributor.authorYang, Wulinen
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce Een
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-13T13:43:18Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-13T13:43:18Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-05en
dc.identifier.citationMyung J, Yang W, Saikaly P, Logan BE (2018) Copper current collectors reduce long-term fouling of air cathodes in microbial fuel cells. Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7ew00518k.en
dc.identifier.issn2053-1400en
dc.identifier.issn2053-1419en
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/c7ew00518ken
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627115-
dc.description.abstractLong-term operation of wastewater-fed, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with cathodes made of activated carbon and stainless steel (SS) current collectors can result in decreased performance due to cathode fouling. Copper has good antimicrobial properties, and it is more electrically conductive than SS. To demonstrate that a copper current collector could produce a more fouling resistant cathode, MFCs with air cathodes using either SS or copper current collectors were operated using domestic wastewater for 27 weeks. The reduction in biofouling over time was shown by less biofilm formation on the copper cathode surface compared to SS cathodes, due to the antimicrobial properties of copper. Maximum power densities from 17–27 weeks were 440 ± 38 mW/m2 using copper and 370 ± 21 mW/m2 using SS cathodes. The main difference in the microbial community was a nitrifying community on the SS cathodes, which was not present on the copper cathodes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program via cooperative research agreement W9132T-16-2-0014 with the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center.en
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry (RSC)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2018/EW/C7EW00518K#!divAbstracten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Environmental Science: Water Research & Technologyen
dc.subjectCopperen
dc.subjectCathode foulingen
dc.subjectAntimicrobial effecten
dc.subjectCurrent collectorsen
dc.subjectAir cathodesen
dc.subjectMFCsen
dc.titleCopper current collectors reduce long-term fouling of air cathodes in microbial fuel cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science: Water Research & Technologyen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USAen
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
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