Mudcake growth: Model and implications

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626417
Title:
Mudcake growth: Model and implications
Authors:
Liu, Q.; Santamarina, Carlos ( 0000-0001-8708-2827 )
Abstract:
Oil and gas account for 60% of the world's energy consumption. Drilling muds that are used to advance oil and gas wells must be engineered to avoid wellbore integrity problems associated with mud cake formation, to favor cake erosion during cementing, and to prevent partial differential sticking. We developed a robust mud cake growth model for water-based mud based on wide stress-range constitutive equations within a Lagrangian reference system to avoid non-natural moving boundary solutions. The comprehensive mud cake growth model readily accommodates environmental factors (e.g., temperature, pH, and ionic concentration) and defines the yield stress distribution for displacement-erosion analyses. Results show that the mud cake thickness is more sensitive to time than to filtration pressure, therefore, time controls the non-uniform distribution of mudcake thickness during drilling. Long filtration time, high permeability, high salinity, high in-situ temperature and low viscosity exacerbate fluid loss and give rise to thick filter cakes. The analysis of residual cake thickness during cement displacement must take into account the effective stress dependent mudcake formation and the time-dependent mud thixotropy. Thixotropy dominates the mud yield stress at high void ratios, e.g. e > 20. The offsetting force that causes differential pressure sticking increases sub-linearly as a power function of the still-time.
KAUST Department:
Earth Science and Engineering Program
Citation:
Liu Q, Santamarina JC (2017) Mudcake growth: Model and implications. Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.petrol.2017.12.044.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering
Issue Date:
15-Dec-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.petrol.2017.12.044
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0920-4105
Sponsors:
This research was supported by the KAUST endowment. G. E Abelskamp edited the manuscript.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092041051731001X
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Earth Science and Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Q.en
dc.contributor.authorSantamarina, Carlosen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T13:57:04Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-21T13:57:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-15en
dc.identifier.citationLiu Q, Santamarina JC (2017) Mudcake growth: Model and implications. Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.petrol.2017.12.044.en
dc.identifier.issn0920-4105en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.petrol.2017.12.044en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626417-
dc.description.abstractOil and gas account for 60% of the world's energy consumption. Drilling muds that are used to advance oil and gas wells must be engineered to avoid wellbore integrity problems associated with mud cake formation, to favor cake erosion during cementing, and to prevent partial differential sticking. We developed a robust mud cake growth model for water-based mud based on wide stress-range constitutive equations within a Lagrangian reference system to avoid non-natural moving boundary solutions. The comprehensive mud cake growth model readily accommodates environmental factors (e.g., temperature, pH, and ionic concentration) and defines the yield stress distribution for displacement-erosion analyses. Results show that the mud cake thickness is more sensitive to time than to filtration pressure, therefore, time controls the non-uniform distribution of mudcake thickness during drilling. Long filtration time, high permeability, high salinity, high in-situ temperature and low viscosity exacerbate fluid loss and give rise to thick filter cakes. The analysis of residual cake thickness during cement displacement must take into account the effective stress dependent mudcake formation and the time-dependent mud thixotropy. Thixotropy dominates the mud yield stress at high void ratios, e.g. e > 20. The offsetting force that causes differential pressure sticking increases sub-linearly as a power function of the still-time.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the KAUST endowment. G. E Abelskamp edited the manuscript.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092041051731001Xen
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, [, , (2017-12-15)] DOI: 10.1016/j.petrol.2017.12.044 . © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMudcakeen
dc.subjectDrilling muden
dc.subjectCement displacementen
dc.subjectThixotropyen
dc.subjectDifferential pressure stickingen
dc.titleMudcake growth: Model and implicationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Petroleum Science and Engineeringen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
kaust.authorLiu, Q.en
kaust.authorSantamarina, Carlosen
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