Nanoscale Morphology of Doctor Bladed versus Spin-Coated Organic Photovoltaic Films

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626296
Title:
Nanoscale Morphology of Doctor Bladed versus Spin-Coated Organic Photovoltaic Films
Authors:
Pokuri, Balaji Sesha Sarath ( 0000-0002-5816-0184 ) ; Sit, Joseph; Wodo, Olga; Baran, Derya ( 0000-0003-2196-8187 ) ; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J.; Moule, Adam J.; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar
Abstract:
Recent advances in efficiency of organic photovoltaics are driven by judicious selection of processing conditions that result in a “desired” morphology. An important theme of morphology research is quantifying the effect of processing conditions on morphology and relating it to device efficiency. State-of-the-art morphology quantification methods provide film-averaged or 2D-projected features that only indirectly correlate with performance, making causal reasoning nontrivial. Accessing the 3D distribution of material, however, provides a means of directly mapping processing to performance. In this paper, two recently developed techniques are integrated—reconstruction of 3D morphology and subsequent conversion into intuitive morphology descriptors —to comprehensively image and quantify morphology. These techniques are applied on films generated by doctor blading and spin coating, additionally investigating the effect of thermal annealing. It is found that morphology of all samples exhibits very high connectivity to electrodes. Not surprisingly, thermal annealing consistently increases the average domain size in the samples, aiding exciton generation. Furthermore, annealing also improves the balance of interfaces, enhancing exciton dissociation. A comparison of morphology descriptors impacting each stage of photophysics (exciton generation, dissociation, and charge transport) reveals that spin-annealed sample exhibits superior morphology-based performance indicators. This suggests substantial room for improvement of blade-based methods (process optimization) for morphology tuning to enhance performance of large area devices.
KAUST Department:
Materials Science and Engineering Program
Citation:
Pokuri BSS, Sit J, Wodo O, Baran D, Ameri T, et al. (2017) Nanoscale Morphology of Doctor Bladed versus Spin-Coated Organic Photovoltaic Films. Advanced Energy Materials 7: 1701269. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201701269.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Advanced Energy Materials
Issue Date:
17-Aug-2017
DOI:
10.1002/aenm.201701269
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1614-6832
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aenm.201701269/full
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Materials Science and Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPokuri, Balaji Sesha Sarathen
dc.contributor.authorSit, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorWodo, Olgaen
dc.contributor.authorBaran, Deryaen
dc.contributor.authorAmeri, Tayebehen
dc.contributor.authorBrabec, Christoph J.en
dc.contributor.authorMoule, Adam J.en
dc.contributor.authorGanapathysubramanian, Baskaren
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-05T13:15:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-05T13:15:50Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-17en
dc.identifier.citationPokuri BSS, Sit J, Wodo O, Baran D, Ameri T, et al. (2017) Nanoscale Morphology of Doctor Bladed versus Spin-Coated Organic Photovoltaic Films. Advanced Energy Materials 7: 1701269. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201701269.en
dc.identifier.issn1614-6832en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aenm.201701269en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626296-
dc.description.abstractRecent advances in efficiency of organic photovoltaics are driven by judicious selection of processing conditions that result in a “desired” morphology. An important theme of morphology research is quantifying the effect of processing conditions on morphology and relating it to device efficiency. State-of-the-art morphology quantification methods provide film-averaged or 2D-projected features that only indirectly correlate with performance, making causal reasoning nontrivial. Accessing the 3D distribution of material, however, provides a means of directly mapping processing to performance. In this paper, two recently developed techniques are integrated—reconstruction of 3D morphology and subsequent conversion into intuitive morphology descriptors —to comprehensively image and quantify morphology. These techniques are applied on films generated by doctor blading and spin coating, additionally investigating the effect of thermal annealing. It is found that morphology of all samples exhibits very high connectivity to electrodes. Not surprisingly, thermal annealing consistently increases the average domain size in the samples, aiding exciton generation. Furthermore, annealing also improves the balance of interfaces, enhancing exciton dissociation. A comparison of morphology descriptors impacting each stage of photophysics (exciton generation, dissociation, and charge transport) reveals that spin-annealed sample exhibits superior morphology-based performance indicators. This suggests substantial room for improvement of blade-based methods (process optimization) for morphology tuning to enhance performance of large area devices.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aenm.201701269/fullen
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Nanoscale Morphology of Doctor Bladed versus Spin-Coated Organic Photovoltaic Films, which has been published in final form at http://doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201701269. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.en
dc.titleNanoscale Morphology of Doctor Bladed versus Spin-Coated Organic Photovoltaic Filmsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Energy Materialsen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering; Iowa State University; Ames IA 50010 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering; University of California Davis; CA 95616 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; University at Buffalo; State University of New York; Buffalo New York 14260 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering; Friedrich-Alexander University; i- Meet; Erlangen 91058 Germanyen
kaust.authorBaran, Deryaen
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