Harnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626280
Title:
Harnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation
Authors:
Mahas, Ahmed ( 0000-0003-1572-2383 ) ; Neal Stewart, C.; Mahfouz, Magdy M.
Abstract:
Genome editing has enabled broad advances and novel approaches in studies of gene function and structure; now, emerging methods aim to precisely engineer post-transcriptional processes. Developing precise, efficient molecular tools to alter the transcriptome holds great promise for biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Different approaches have been employed for targeted degradation of RNA species in eukaryotes, but they lack programmability and versatility, thereby limiting their utility for diverse applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been harnessed for genome editing in many eukaryotic species and, using a catalytically inactive Cas9 variant, the CRISPR/dCas9 system has been repurposed for transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have used other CRISPR/Cas systems for targeted RNA degradation and RNA-based manipulations. For example, Cas13a, a Type VI-A endonuclease, has been identified as an RNA-guided RNA ribonuclease and used for manipulation of RNA. Here, we discuss different modalities for targeted RNA interference with an emphasis on the potential applications of CRISPR/Cas systems as programmable transcriptional regulators for broad uses, including functional biology, biotechnology, and synthetic biology applications.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Laboratory for Genome Engineering, Division of Biological Sciences, 4700 King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia
Citation:
Mahas A, Neal Stewart C, Mahfouz MM (2017) Harnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Biotechnology Advances. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.11.008.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Biotechnology Advances
Issue Date:
29-Nov-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.11.008
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-9750
Sponsors:
This study was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0734975017301507
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMahas, Ahmeden
dc.contributor.authorNeal Stewart, C.en
dc.contributor.authorMahfouz, Magdy M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-05T06:12:00Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-05T06:12:00Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-29en
dc.identifier.citationMahas A, Neal Stewart C, Mahfouz MM (2017) Harnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Biotechnology Advances. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.11.008.en
dc.identifier.issn0734-9750en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.11.008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626280-
dc.description.abstractGenome editing has enabled broad advances and novel approaches in studies of gene function and structure; now, emerging methods aim to precisely engineer post-transcriptional processes. Developing precise, efficient molecular tools to alter the transcriptome holds great promise for biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Different approaches have been employed for targeted degradation of RNA species in eukaryotes, but they lack programmability and versatility, thereby limiting their utility for diverse applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been harnessed for genome editing in many eukaryotic species and, using a catalytically inactive Cas9 variant, the CRISPR/dCas9 system has been repurposed for transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have used other CRISPR/Cas systems for targeted RNA degradation and RNA-based manipulations. For example, Cas13a, a Type VI-A endonuclease, has been identified as an RNA-guided RNA ribonuclease and used for manipulation of RNA. Here, we discuss different modalities for targeted RNA interference with an emphasis on the potential applications of CRISPR/Cas systems as programmable transcriptional regulators for broad uses, including functional biology, biotechnology, and synthetic biology applications.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0734975017301507en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Biotechnology Advances. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Biotechnology Advances, [, , (2017-11-29)] DOI: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.11.008 . © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectGene editingen
dc.subjectCRISPR/Cas9en
dc.subjectSite-specific endonucleasesen
dc.subjectFunctional genomicsen
dc.subjectTranscriptional regulationen
dc.subjectSynthetic biologyen
dc.subjectBioengineeringen
dc.subjectCas13en
dc.subjectdCas9en
dc.titleHarnessing CRISPR/Cas systems for programmable transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory for Genome Engineering, Division of Biological Sciences, 4700 King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.identifier.journalBiotechnology Advancesen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 252 Ellington Plant Sciences, 2431 Joe Johnson Dr., Knoxville, TN 37996, USAen
kaust.authorMahas, Ahmeden
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