Spatial complexities in aboveground carbon stocks of a semi-arid mangrove community: A remote sensing height-biomass-carbon approach

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626204
Title:
Spatial complexities in aboveground carbon stocks of a semi-arid mangrove community: A remote sensing height-biomass-carbon approach
Authors:
Hickey, S.M.; Callow, N.J.; Phinn, S.; Lovelock, C.E.; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 )
Abstract:
Mangroves are integral to ecosystem services provided by the coastal zone, in particular carbon (C) sequestration and storage. Allometric relationships linking mangrove height to estimated biomass and C stocks have been developed from field sampling, while various forms of remote sensing has been used to map vegetation height and biomass. Here we combine both these approaches to investigate spatial patterns in living biomass of mangrove forests in a small area of mangrove in north-west Australia. This study used LiDAR data and Landsat 8 OLI (Operational Land Imager) with allometric equations to derive mangrove height, biomass, and C stock estimates. We estimated the study site, Mangrove Bay, a semi-arid site in north-western Australia, contained 70 Mg ha−1 biomass and 45 Mg C ha−1 organic C, with total stocks of 2417 Mg biomass and 778 Mg organic C. Using spatial statistics to identify the scale of clustering of mangrove pixels, we found that living biomass and C stock declined with increasing distance from hydrological features (creek entrance: 0–150 m; y = −0.00041x + 0.9613, R2 = 0.96; 150–770 m; y = −0.0008x + 1.6808, R2 = 0.73; lagoon: y = −0.0041x + 3.7943, R2 = 0.78). Our results illustrate a set pattern of living C distribution within the mangrove forest, and then highlight the role hydrologic features play in determining C stock distribution in arid zone.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Hickey SM, Callow NJ, Phinn S, Lovelock CE, Duarte CM (2018) Spatial complexities in aboveground carbon stocks of a semi-arid mangrove community: A remote sensing height-biomass-carbon approach. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 200: 194–201. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2017.11.004.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Issue Date:
10-Nov-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecss.2017.11.004
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0272-7714
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the CSIRO Flagship Marine and Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster (Coastal Carbon Cluster) with funding from the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund. We thank Dr Jeff Hansen, Prof. Ryan Lowe, and Prof. Jorg Hacker and Airborne Research Australia, for collecting and providing the LiDAR data. We also thank Kathy Murray and DPAW for providing aerial imagery. Partial support for field sampling was provided by Australian Research Council award DP150104437.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272771417307229
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHickey, S.M.en
dc.contributor.authorCallow, N.J.en
dc.contributor.authorPhinn, S.en
dc.contributor.authorLovelock, C.E.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-23T11:51:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-23T11:51:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-10en
dc.identifier.citationHickey SM, Callow NJ, Phinn S, Lovelock CE, Duarte CM (2018) Spatial complexities in aboveground carbon stocks of a semi-arid mangrove community: A remote sensing height-biomass-carbon approach. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 200: 194–201. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2017.11.004.en
dc.identifier.issn0272-7714en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecss.2017.11.004en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626204-
dc.description.abstractMangroves are integral to ecosystem services provided by the coastal zone, in particular carbon (C) sequestration and storage. Allometric relationships linking mangrove height to estimated biomass and C stocks have been developed from field sampling, while various forms of remote sensing has been used to map vegetation height and biomass. Here we combine both these approaches to investigate spatial patterns in living biomass of mangrove forests in a small area of mangrove in north-west Australia. This study used LiDAR data and Landsat 8 OLI (Operational Land Imager) with allometric equations to derive mangrove height, biomass, and C stock estimates. We estimated the study site, Mangrove Bay, a semi-arid site in north-western Australia, contained 70 Mg ha−1 biomass and 45 Mg C ha−1 organic C, with total stocks of 2417 Mg biomass and 778 Mg organic C. Using spatial statistics to identify the scale of clustering of mangrove pixels, we found that living biomass and C stock declined with increasing distance from hydrological features (creek entrance: 0–150 m; y = −0.00041x + 0.9613, R2 = 0.96; 150–770 m; y = −0.0008x + 1.6808, R2 = 0.73; lagoon: y = −0.0041x + 3.7943, R2 = 0.78). Our results illustrate a set pattern of living C distribution within the mangrove forest, and then highlight the role hydrologic features play in determining C stock distribution in arid zone.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the CSIRO Flagship Marine and Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster (Coastal Carbon Cluster) with funding from the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund. We thank Dr Jeff Hansen, Prof. Ryan Lowe, and Prof. Jorg Hacker and Airborne Research Australia, for collecting and providing the LiDAR data. We also thank Kathy Murray and DPAW for providing aerial imagery. Partial support for field sampling was provided by Australian Research Council award DP150104437.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272771417307229en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published inEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 10 November 2017. DOI: 10.1016/j.ecss.2017.11.004. © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.titleSpatial complexities in aboveground carbon stocks of a semi-arid mangrove community: A remote sensing height-biomass-carbon approachen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Scienceen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Agriculture and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australiaen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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