Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626166
Title:
Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes
Authors:
Yoon, Minho; Min, Sung-Wook; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Yong Uk; Oh, Min Suk; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. ( 0000-0002-0978-8813 ) ; Park, Sung Ha; Im, Seongil
Abstract:
Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.
KAUST Department:
Materials Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Yoon M, Min S-W, Dugasani SR, Lee YU, Oh MS, et al. (2017) Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes. Small: 1703006. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smll.201703006.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Small
Issue Date:
6-Nov-2017
DOI:
10.1002/smll.201703006
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1613-6810
Sponsors:
M.Y. and S.-W.M. contributed equally to this work. The authors acknowledge the financial support from NRF (NRL program: Grant No. 2017R1A2A1A05001278, SRC program: Grant No. 2017R1A5A1014862, vdWMRC center), and from Nano Material Technology Development Program: Grant no. 2012M3A7B4049801.
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smll.201703006/full
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYoon, Minhoen
dc.contributor.authorMin, Sung-Wooken
dc.contributor.authorDugasani, Sreekantha Reddyen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Yong Uken
dc.contributor.authorOh, Min Suken
dc.contributor.authorAnthopoulos, Thomas D.en
dc.contributor.authorPark, Sung Haen
dc.contributor.authorIm, Seongilen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-15T11:04:55Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-15T11:04:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-06en
dc.identifier.citationYoon M, Min S-W, Dugasani SR, Lee YU, Oh MS, et al. (2017) Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes. Small: 1703006. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smll.201703006.en
dc.identifier.issn1613-6810en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/smll.201703006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626166-
dc.description.abstractRecently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.en
dc.description.sponsorshipM.Y. and S.-W.M. contributed equally to this work. The authors acknowledge the financial support from NRF (NRL program: Grant No. 2017R1A2A1A05001278, SRC program: Grant No. 2017R1A5A1014862, vdWMRC center), and from Nano Material Technology Development Program: Grant no. 2012M3A7B4049801.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smll.201703006/fullen
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes, which has been published in final form at http://doi.org/10.1002/smll.201703006. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.en
dc.subjectNanosheetsen
dc.subject2D Dna Crystalsen
dc.subjectCharge-transport Mechanismsen
dc.subjectSemitransparent Conducting Oxideen
dc.subjectTunnel Junction Diodesen
dc.titleCharge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalSmallen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics; Yonsei University; Seoul 120-749 South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics; Sungkyunkwan University; Suwon 440-746 South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionMaterial Research Centre; Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology; Suwon 16678 South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionDisplay Materials & Components Research Center; Korea Electronics Technology Institute; Seongnam 463-816 South Koreaen
kaust.authorAnthopoulos, Thomas D.en
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