Butterflyfishes as a System for Investigating Pair Bonding

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626162
Title:
Butterflyfishes as a System for Investigating Pair Bonding
Authors:
Nowicki, Jessica ( 0000-0002-6373-8761 ) ; O'Connell, Lauren; Cowman, Peter F ( 0000-0001-5977-5327 ) ; Walker, Stefan; Coker, Darren James; Pratchett, Morgan
Abstract:
For many animals, affiliative relationships such as pair bonds form the foundation of society, and are highly adaptive. Animal systems amenable for comparatively studying pair bonding are important for identifying underlying biological mechanisms, but mostly exist in mammals. Better establishing fish systems will enable comparison of pair bonding mechanisms across taxonomically distant lineages that may reveal general underlying principles. We examined the utility of wild butterflyfishes (f: Chaetodontidae; g: Chaetodon) for comparatively studying pair bonding. Stochastic character mapping inferred that within the family, pairing is ancestral, with at least seven independent transitions to group formation and seven transition to solitary behavior from the late Miocene to recent. In six sympatric and wide-spread species representing a clade with one ancestrally reconstructed transition from paired to solitary grouping, we then verified social systems at Lizard Island, Australia. In situ observations confirmed that Chaetodon baronessa, C. lunulatus, and C. vagabundus are predominantly pair bonding, whereas C. rainfordi, C. plebeius, and C. trifascialis are predominantly solitary. Even in the predominantly pair bonding species, C. lunulatus, a proportion of adults (15 %) are solitary. Importantly, inter- and intra-specific differences in social systems do not co-vary with other previously established attributes (geographic occurrence, parental care, diet, or territoriality). Hence, the proposed butterflyfish populations are promising for comparative analyses of pair bonding and its mechanistic underpinnings. Avenues for further developing the system are proposed, including determining whether the utility of these species applies across their geographic disruptions.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Nowicki J, O’Connell L, Cowman PF, Walker S, Coker D, et al. (2017) Butterflyfishes as a System for Investigating Pair Bonding. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/214544.
Publisher:
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Issue Date:
14-Nov-2017
DOI:
10.1101/214544
Type:
Working Paper
Sponsors:
We thank the anonymous referees for their thoughtful and constructive comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript. Thank you Andrew Cole, Marian Wong, Kelly Boyle, and Tim Tricas for logistic advice on butterflyfish capture and sexing. Manuela Giammusso, Kyvely Vlahakis, and Siobhan Heatwole provided excellent field assistance. David Hallmark kindly donated tagging equipment for this study. We thank Lizard Island Research Station for field support. We acknowledge all of the fishes that were sacrificed in order to undertake this project. This project was financially supported by ARC grants to M.S.P and S.P.W, and a GRS postgraduate research grant to J.P.N. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority permit: G10/33239.1, G13/35909.1, G14/37213.1; James Cook University General Fisheries permit: 170251; James Cook University Animal Ethics approval: A1874.
Additional Links:
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/11/08/214544
Appears in Collections:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Other/General Submission; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNowicki, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorCowman, Peter Fen
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Stefanen
dc.contributor.authorCoker, Darren Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorPratchett, Morganen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-15T10:58:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-15T10:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-14en
dc.identifier.citationNowicki J, O’Connell L, Cowman PF, Walker S, Coker D, et al. (2017) Butterflyfishes as a System for Investigating Pair Bonding. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/214544.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1101/214544en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626162-
dc.description.abstractFor many animals, affiliative relationships such as pair bonds form the foundation of society, and are highly adaptive. Animal systems amenable for comparatively studying pair bonding are important for identifying underlying biological mechanisms, but mostly exist in mammals. Better establishing fish systems will enable comparison of pair bonding mechanisms across taxonomically distant lineages that may reveal general underlying principles. We examined the utility of wild butterflyfishes (f: Chaetodontidae; g: Chaetodon) for comparatively studying pair bonding. Stochastic character mapping inferred that within the family, pairing is ancestral, with at least seven independent transitions to group formation and seven transition to solitary behavior from the late Miocene to recent. In six sympatric and wide-spread species representing a clade with one ancestrally reconstructed transition from paired to solitary grouping, we then verified social systems at Lizard Island, Australia. In situ observations confirmed that Chaetodon baronessa, C. lunulatus, and C. vagabundus are predominantly pair bonding, whereas C. rainfordi, C. plebeius, and C. trifascialis are predominantly solitary. Even in the predominantly pair bonding species, C. lunulatus, a proportion of adults (15 %) are solitary. Importantly, inter- and intra-specific differences in social systems do not co-vary with other previously established attributes (geographic occurrence, parental care, diet, or territoriality). Hence, the proposed butterflyfish populations are promising for comparative analyses of pair bonding and its mechanistic underpinnings. Avenues for further developing the system are proposed, including determining whether the utility of these species applies across their geographic disruptions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the anonymous referees for their thoughtful and constructive comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript. Thank you Andrew Cole, Marian Wong, Kelly Boyle, and Tim Tricas for logistic advice on butterflyfish capture and sexing. Manuela Giammusso, Kyvely Vlahakis, and Siobhan Heatwole provided excellent field assistance. David Hallmark kindly donated tagging equipment for this study. We thank Lizard Island Research Station for field support. We acknowledge all of the fishes that were sacrificed in order to undertake this project. This project was financially supported by ARC grants to M.S.P and S.P.W, and a GRS postgraduate research grant to J.P.N. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority permit: G10/33239.1, G13/35909.1, G14/37213.1; James Cook University General Fisheries permit: 170251; James Cook University Animal Ethics approval: A1874.en
dc.publisherCold Spring Harbor Laboratoryen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/11/08/214544en
dc.rightsThe copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.titleButterflyfishes as a System for Investigating Pair Bondingen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.eprint.versionPre-printen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305en
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionFAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USAen
kaust.authorCoker, Darren Jamesen
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