Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626130
Title:
Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials
Authors:
Ravva, Mahesh Kumar ( 0000-0001-9619-0176 ) ; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc ( 0000-0001-7278-4471 )
Abstract:
In this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic semiconductors. We begin by describing general aspects of materials design, including the wide variety of chemistries exploited to control the electronic and optical properties of these materials. We then discuss explicit examples of how the study of noncovalent interactions can provide deeper chemical insights that can improve the design of new generations of organic electronic materials.
KAUST Department:
Laboratory for Computational and Theoretical Chemistry of Advanced Materials; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Ravva MK, Risko C, Brédas J-L (2017) Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials. Non-Covalent Interactions in Quantum Chemistry and Physics: 277–302. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-809835-6.00011-6.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Non-Covalent Interactions in Quantum Chemistry and Physics
Issue Date:
29-Jun-2017
DOI:
10.1016/B978-0-12-809835-6.00011-6
Type:
Book Chapter
Sponsors:
This work has been supported in part by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), the KAUST Competitive Research Grant Program, and the Office of Naval Research Global (Award N62909-15-1-2003). We acknowledge the IT Research Computing Team and Supercomputing Laboratory at King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST) for providing computational and storage resources. The work at the University of Kentucky was supported by a seed grant from the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) and start-up funds provided by the University of Kentucky Vice President for Research. We gratefully thank Drs. Sean Ryno, Naga Rajesh Tummala, and Chris Sutton for stimulating discussions.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128098356000116
Appears in Collections:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Book Chapters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRavva, Mahesh Kumaren
dc.contributor.authorRisko, Chaden
dc.contributor.authorBredas, Jean-Lucen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-06T11:08:45Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-06T11:08:45Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-29en
dc.identifier.citationRavva MK, Risko C, Brédas J-L (2017) Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials. Non-Covalent Interactions in Quantum Chemistry and Physics: 277–302. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-809835-6.00011-6.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-809835-6.00011-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626130-
dc.description.abstractIn this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic semiconductors. We begin by describing general aspects of materials design, including the wide variety of chemistries exploited to control the electronic and optical properties of these materials. We then discuss explicit examples of how the study of noncovalent interactions can provide deeper chemical insights that can improve the design of new generations of organic electronic materials.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been supported in part by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), the KAUST Competitive Research Grant Program, and the Office of Naval Research Global (Award N62909-15-1-2003). We acknowledge the IT Research Computing Team and Supercomputing Laboratory at King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST) for providing computational and storage resources. The work at the University of Kentucky was supported by a seed grant from the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) and start-up funds provided by the University of Kentucky Vice President for Research. We gratefully thank Drs. Sean Ryno, Naga Rajesh Tummala, and Chris Sutton for stimulating discussions.en
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128098356000116en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Non-Covalent Interactions in Quantum Chemistry and Physics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Non-Covalent Interactions in Quantum Chemistry and Physics, 23 June 2017. DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-809835-6.00011-6. © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectNoncovalent interactionsen
dc.subjectOligoacenesen
dc.subjectOrganic semiconductorsen
dc.subjectRubreneen
dc.subjectTetraceneen
dc.subjectπ-conjugated moleculesen
dc.titleNoncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materialsen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory for Computational and Theoretical Chemistry of Advanced Materialsen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalNon-Covalent Interactions in Quantum Chemistry and Physicsen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, , United Statesen
kaust.authorRavva, Mahesh Kumaren
kaust.authorBredas, Jean-Lucen
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