The More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Events

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/626104
Title:
The More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Events
Authors:
Luong, Thang M.; Castro, Christopher L.; Chang, Hsin-I; Lahmers, Timothy; Adams, David K.; Ochoa-Moya, Carlos A.
Abstract:
Long-term changes in North American monsoon (NAM) precipitation intensity in the southwestern United States are evaluated through the use of convective-permitting model simulations of objectively identified severe weather events during
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Luong TM, Castro CL, Chang H-I, Lahmers T, Adams DK, et al. (2017) The More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Events. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 56: 2509–2529. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0358.1.
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Journal:
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
Issue Date:
3-Jul-2017
DOI:
10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0358.1
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1558-8424; 1558-8432
Sponsors:
This work was principally supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP; Project RC-2205) through the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Additional support was provided by UNAM-PAPIIT Projects IA103916 and IA100916; the Consortium for Arizona-Mexico Arid Environments (CAZMEX), with funding from the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Technologia de Mexico and The University of Arizona; and the University of Arizona Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program (TAAP), authorized by Public Law 109-448, along with the University of Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund (TRIF). The comments from three anonymous reviewers substantially improved the quality of the manuscript. Various scientific materials and text in this paper were taken from the Ph.D. thesis of the first author, which can be found online (http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595660), and the final SERDP RC-2205 project report (Castro 2017).
Additional Links:
http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0358.1
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLuong, Thang M.en
dc.contributor.authorCastro, Christopher L.en
dc.contributor.authorChang, Hsin-Ien
dc.contributor.authorLahmers, Timothyen
dc.contributor.authorAdams, David K.en
dc.contributor.authorOchoa-Moya, Carlos A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-02T09:09:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-02T09:09:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-03en
dc.identifier.citationLuong TM, Castro CL, Chang H-I, Lahmers T, Adams DK, et al. (2017) The More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Events. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 56: 2509–2529. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0358.1.en
dc.identifier.issn1558-8424en
dc.identifier.issn1558-8432en
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0358.1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626104-
dc.description.abstractLong-term changes in North American monsoon (NAM) precipitation intensity in the southwestern United States are evaluated through the use of convective-permitting model simulations of objectively identified severe weather events duringen
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was principally supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP; Project RC-2205) through the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Additional support was provided by UNAM-PAPIIT Projects IA103916 and IA100916; the Consortium for Arizona-Mexico Arid Environments (CAZMEX), with funding from the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Technologia de Mexico and The University of Arizona; and the University of Arizona Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program (TAAP), authorized by Public Law 109-448, along with the University of Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund (TRIF). The comments from three anonymous reviewers substantially improved the quality of the manuscript. Various scientific materials and text in this paper were taken from the Ph.D. thesis of the first author, which can be found online (http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595660), and the final SERDP RC-2205 project report (Castro 2017).en
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0358.1en
dc.rights© Copyright 2017 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be “fair use” under Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act September 2010 Page 2 or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Act (17 USC §108, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the AMS’s permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form, such as on a web site or in a searchable database, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statement, requires written permission or a license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policy, available on the AMS Web site located at (http://www.ametsoc.org/) or from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or copyrights@ametsoc.org.en
dc.subjectAtmosphereen
dc.subjectNorth Americaen
dc.subjectPrecipitationen
dc.subjectMesoscale modelsen
dc.subjectRegional effectsen
dc.titleThe More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Eventsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatologyen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de la Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexicoen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, and Centro de la Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexicoen
kaust.authorLuong, Thang M.en
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