The potential for coral reef establishment through free-living stabilization

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625921
Title:
The potential for coral reef establishment through free-living stabilization
Authors:
Hennige, S. J. ( 0000-0002-3059-604X ) ; Burdett, H. L.; Perna, G.; Tudhope, A. W.; Kamenos, N. A. ( 0000-0003-3434-0807 )
Abstract:
Corals thrive in a variety of environments, from low wave and tidal energy lagoons, to high energy tidal reef flats, but remain dependent upon suitable substrate. Herein we reviewed the phenomenon of free-living corals (coralliths), examined whether they have the capacity to create their own stable habitat in otherwise uninhabitable, poor substrate environments through 'free-living stabilization', and explore their potential ecological role on coral reefs. This stabilization could be achieved by coral settlement and survival on mobile substrate, with subsequent growth into free-living coralliths until a critical mass is reached that prevents further movement. This allows for secondary reef colonization by other coral species. To preliminarily test this hypothesis we provide evidence that the potential to support secondary coral colonisation increases with corallith size. Due to the limited diversity of corallith species observed here and in the literature, and the lack of physiological differences exhibited by coralliths here to static controls, it seems likely that only a small selection of coral species have the ability to form coralliths, and the potential to create their own stable habitat.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Hennige SJ, Burdett HL, Perna G, Tudhope AW, Kamenos NA (2017) The potential for coral reef establishment through free-living stabilization. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-13668-7.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
11-Oct-2017
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-13668-7
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
This work was supported by various grants. An Independent Research Fellowship from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to SJH (NE/K009028/1 and NE/K009028/2). An Independent Research Fellowship from the Marine Alliance for Science & Technology for Scotland to HB. An Independent Research Fellowship from the Royal Society of Edinburgh/Scottish Government (RSE 48701/1) and NERC (NE/H010025) to NAK. A Gilchrist Educational Trust with the Gilchrist Fieldwork Award administered by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), and a Research Incentive Grant from the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland to HB, SH and NK (grant #70013). Field sampling was under permission from the Maldives Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture ((OTHR) 30-D/lNDIV/2015).
Additional Links:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-13668-7
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHennige, S. J.en
dc.contributor.authorBurdett, H. L.en
dc.contributor.authorPerna, G.en
dc.contributor.authorTudhope, A. W.en
dc.contributor.authorKamenos, N. A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-22T11:48:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-22T11:48:14Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-11en
dc.identifier.citationHennige SJ, Burdett HL, Perna G, Tudhope AW, Kamenos NA (2017) The potential for coral reef establishment through free-living stabilization. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-13668-7.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-13668-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625921-
dc.description.abstractCorals thrive in a variety of environments, from low wave and tidal energy lagoons, to high energy tidal reef flats, but remain dependent upon suitable substrate. Herein we reviewed the phenomenon of free-living corals (coralliths), examined whether they have the capacity to create their own stable habitat in otherwise uninhabitable, poor substrate environments through 'free-living stabilization', and explore their potential ecological role on coral reefs. This stabilization could be achieved by coral settlement and survival on mobile substrate, with subsequent growth into free-living coralliths until a critical mass is reached that prevents further movement. This allows for secondary reef colonization by other coral species. To preliminarily test this hypothesis we provide evidence that the potential to support secondary coral colonisation increases with corallith size. Due to the limited diversity of corallith species observed here and in the literature, and the lack of physiological differences exhibited by coralliths here to static controls, it seems likely that only a small selection of coral species have the ability to form coralliths, and the potential to create their own stable habitat.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by various grants. An Independent Research Fellowship from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to SJH (NE/K009028/1 and NE/K009028/2). An Independent Research Fellowship from the Marine Alliance for Science & Technology for Scotland to HB. An Independent Research Fellowship from the Royal Society of Edinburgh/Scottish Government (RSE 48701/1) and NERC (NE/H010025) to NAK. A Gilchrist Educational Trust with the Gilchrist Fieldwork Award administered by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), and a Research Incentive Grant from the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland to HB, SH and NK (grant #70013). Field sampling was under permission from the Maldives Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture ((OTHR) 30-D/lNDIV/2015).en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-13668-7en
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleThe potential for coral reef establishment through free-living stabilizationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, James Hutton Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FE, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Energy, Geoscience, Infrastructure and Society, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS, Edinburgh, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK.en
kaust.authorPerna, G.en
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