Morphological evolution and internal strain mapping of pomelo peel using X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625893
Title:
Morphological evolution and internal strain mapping of pomelo peel using X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation
Authors:
Wang, B.; Pan, B. ( 0000-0002-2249-8896 ) ; Lubineau, Gilles ( 0000-0002-7370-6093 )
Abstract:
Cellular microstructures within natural materials enlighten and promote the development of novel materials and structures in the industrial and engineering fields. Characterization of the microstructures and mechanical properties of these natural materials can help to understand the morphology-related mechanical properties and guide the structural optimization in industrial design. Among these natural cellular materials, pomelo peels, having a foam-like hierarchical microstructure, represent an ideal model for developing materials with high energy absorption efficiency. In this work, by combining X-ray tomographic imaging technique and digital volume correlation (DVC), in-situ stepwise uniaxial compression tests were performed to quantify the internal morphological evolution and kinematic responses of pomelo peel samples during compression. Via these experiments, the varying microstructure features and thus diverse resistance to compression from endocarp to exocarp are examined, and the evolution of both bundles bending and large strain domain from endocarp to mesocarp are explored. Based on the experimental results, the microstructure-related mechanical properties of pomelo peels in response to compressive loading that demonstrates nearly linear morphology-mechanics relationship were revealed.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Wang B, Pan B, Lubineau G (2017) Morphological evolution and internal strain mapping of pomelo peel using X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Materials & Design. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2017.10.038.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Materials & Design
Issue Date:
15-Oct-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.matdes.2017.10.038
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0264-1275
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant nos. 11427802, and 11632010), the Aeronautical Science Foundation of China (2016ZD51034). We also thank King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for its support.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264127517309656
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWang, B.en
dc.contributor.authorPan, B.en
dc.contributor.authorLubineau, Gillesen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-17T11:47:40Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-17T11:47:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-15en
dc.identifier.citationWang B, Pan B, Lubineau G (2017) Morphological evolution and internal strain mapping of pomelo peel using X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Materials & Design. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2017.10.038.en
dc.identifier.issn0264-1275en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.matdes.2017.10.038en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625893-
dc.description.abstractCellular microstructures within natural materials enlighten and promote the development of novel materials and structures in the industrial and engineering fields. Characterization of the microstructures and mechanical properties of these natural materials can help to understand the morphology-related mechanical properties and guide the structural optimization in industrial design. Among these natural cellular materials, pomelo peels, having a foam-like hierarchical microstructure, represent an ideal model for developing materials with high energy absorption efficiency. In this work, by combining X-ray tomographic imaging technique and digital volume correlation (DVC), in-situ stepwise uniaxial compression tests were performed to quantify the internal morphological evolution and kinematic responses of pomelo peel samples during compression. Via these experiments, the varying microstructure features and thus diverse resistance to compression from endocarp to exocarp are examined, and the evolution of both bundles bending and large strain domain from endocarp to mesocarp are explored. Based on the experimental results, the microstructure-related mechanical properties of pomelo peels in response to compressive loading that demonstrates nearly linear morphology-mechanics relationship were revealed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant nos. 11427802, and 11632010), the Aeronautical Science Foundation of China (2016ZD51034). We also thank King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for its support.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264127517309656en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Materials & Design. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Materials & Design, 14 October 2017. DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2017.10.038. © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectPomelo peelen
dc.subjectDigital volume correlationen
dc.subjectX-ray tomographic imagingen
dc.subject3D deformation measurementen
dc.titleMorphological evolution and internal strain mapping of pomelo peel using X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalMaterials & Designen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Solid Mechanics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, Chinaen
kaust.authorLubineau, Gillesen
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