Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625858
Title:
Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis
Authors:
Liu, Huanle; Stephens, Timothy G.; González-Pech, Raúl; Beltran, Victor H.; Lapeyre, Bruno; Bongaerts, Pim; Cooke, Ira; Bourne, David G.; Forêt, Sylvain; Miller, David John; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.; Voolstra, Christian R. ( 0000-0003-4555-3795 ) ; Ragan, Mark A. ( 0000-0003-1672-7020 ) ; Chan, Cheong Xin ( 0000-0002-3729-8176 )
Abstract:
Symbiosis between dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals forms the trophic foundation of the world's coral reef ecosystems. Here we present the first draft genome of Symbiodinium goreaui (Clade C, type C1: 1.03 Gbp), one of the most ubiquitous endosymbionts associated with corals, and an improved draft genome of Symbiodinium kawagutii (Clade F, strain CS-156: 1.05 Gbp), previously sequenced as strain CCMP2468, to further elucidate genomic signatures of this symbiosis. Comparative analysis of four available Symbiodinium genomes against other dinoflagellate genomes led to the identification of 2460 nuclear gene families that show evidence of positive selection, including genes involved in photosynthesis, transmembrane ion transport, synthesis and modification of amino acids and glycoproteins, and stress response. Further, we identified extensive sets of genes for meiosis and response to light stress. These draft genomes provide a foundational resource for advancing our understanding Symbiodinium biology and the coral-algal symbiosis.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Liu H, Stephens TG, González-Pech R, Beltran VH, Lapeyre B, et al. (2017) Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis . Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/198762.
Publisher:
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Issue Date:
6-Oct-2017
DOI:
10.1101/198762
Type:
Working Paper
Sponsors:
We thank Manuel Aranda for advance access to the S. microadriaticum genome data, and Todd LaJeunesse for information on the original isolation of S. kawagutii. This project was supported by the Reef Future Genomics (ReFuGe) 2020 International Consortium and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation. The data reported in this work were supported by funding from Bioplatforms Australia through the Australian Government National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). In memory of SF, our friend and colleague who is sorely missed.
Additional Links:
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/10/05/198762
Appears in Collections:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Other/General Submission; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Huanleen
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Timothy G.en
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Pech, Raúlen
dc.contributor.authorBeltran, Victor H.en
dc.contributor.authorLapeyre, Brunoen
dc.contributor.authorBongaerts, Pimen
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Iraen
dc.contributor.authorBourne, David G.en
dc.contributor.authorForêt, Sylvainen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, David Johnen
dc.contributor.authorvan Oppen, Madeleine J. H.en
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.en
dc.contributor.authorRagan, Mark A.en
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cheong Xinen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-11T12:03:22Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-11T12:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-06en
dc.identifier.citationLiu H, Stephens TG, González-Pech R, Beltran VH, Lapeyre B, et al. (2017) Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis . Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/198762.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1101/198762en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625858-
dc.description.abstractSymbiosis between dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals forms the trophic foundation of the world's coral reef ecosystems. Here we present the first draft genome of Symbiodinium goreaui (Clade C, type C1: 1.03 Gbp), one of the most ubiquitous endosymbionts associated with corals, and an improved draft genome of Symbiodinium kawagutii (Clade F, strain CS-156: 1.05 Gbp), previously sequenced as strain CCMP2468, to further elucidate genomic signatures of this symbiosis. Comparative analysis of four available Symbiodinium genomes against other dinoflagellate genomes led to the identification of 2460 nuclear gene families that show evidence of positive selection, including genes involved in photosynthesis, transmembrane ion transport, synthesis and modification of amino acids and glycoproteins, and stress response. Further, we identified extensive sets of genes for meiosis and response to light stress. These draft genomes provide a foundational resource for advancing our understanding Symbiodinium biology and the coral-algal symbiosis.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Manuel Aranda for advance access to the S. microadriaticum genome data, and Todd LaJeunesse for information on the original isolation of S. kawagutii. This project was supported by the Reef Future Genomics (ReFuGe) 2020 International Consortium and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation. The data reported in this work were supported by funding from Bioplatforms Australia through the Australian Government National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). In memory of SF, our friend and colleague who is sorely missed.en
dc.publisherCold Spring Harbor Laboratoryen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/10/05/198762en
dc.rightsThe copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.titleSymbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosisen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.eprint.versionPre-printen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire d’excellence CORAIL, Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l’Environnement, Moorea 98729, French Polynesiaen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionGlobal Change Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionResearch School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australiaen
kaust.authorVoolstra, Christian R.en
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.