Genomic diversification of giant enteric symbionts reflects host dietary lifestyles

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625748
Title:
Genomic diversification of giant enteric symbionts reflects host dietary lifestyles
Authors:
Ngugi, David ( 0000-0002-0442-4279 ) ; Miyake, Sou ( 0000-0001-7507-1653 ) ; Cahill, Matthew; Vinu, Manikandan; Hackmann, Timothy J.; Blom, Jochen; Tietbohl, Matthew ( 0000-0002-1101-8412 ) ; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 ) ; Stingl, Ulrich ( 0000-0002-0684-2597 )
Abstract:
Herbivorous surgeonfishes are an ecologically successful group of reef fish that rely on marine algae as their principal food source. Here, we elucidated the significance of giant enteric symbionts colonizing these fishes regarding their roles in the digestive processes of hosts feeding predominantly on polysiphonous red algae and brown Turbinaria algae, which contain different polysaccharide constituents. Using metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and metatranscriptomic analyses, we provide evidence of metabolic diversification of enteric microbiota involved in the degradation of algal biomass in these fishes. The enteric microbiota is also phylogenetically and functionally simple relative to the complex lignocellulose-degrading microbiota of terrestrial herbivores. Over 90% of the enzymes for deconstructing algal polysaccharides emanate from members of a single bacterial lineage,
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Ngugi DK, Miyake S, Cahill M, Vinu M, Hackmann TJ, et al. (2017) Genomic diversification of giant enteric symbionts reflects host dietary lifestyles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114: E7592–E7601. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703070114.
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Journal:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Issue Date:
24-Aug-2017
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1703070114
PubMed ID:
28835538
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0027-8424; 1091-6490
Sponsors:
We thank the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Bioscience Core Lab, the Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab, and T. Sinclair-Taylor for their technical and logistical support. We also thank John Howard Choat (James Cook University, Queensland) for his insights on surgeonfish nutrition, Andreas Brune (Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg) for assistance with bacterial nomenclature, and Calder J. Atta (KAUST) for the fish illustrations. This work was supported by KAUST through the Saudi Economic and Development Company Research Excellence Award Program (U.S.).
Additional Links:
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/08/22/1703070114.full
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Reef Genomics, part of the Global Ocean Genome Project

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNgugi, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorMiyake, Souen
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorVinu, Manikandanen
dc.contributor.authorHackmann, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.authorBlom, Jochenen
dc.contributor.authorTietbohl, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorStingl, Ulrichen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-03T12:49:37Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-03T12:49:37Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-24en
dc.identifier.citationNgugi DK, Miyake S, Cahill M, Vinu M, Hackmann TJ, et al. (2017) Genomic diversification of giant enteric symbionts reflects host dietary lifestyles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114: E7592–E7601. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703070114.en
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490en
dc.identifier.pmid28835538-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1703070114en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625748-
dc.description.abstractHerbivorous surgeonfishes are an ecologically successful group of reef fish that rely on marine algae as their principal food source. Here, we elucidated the significance of giant enteric symbionts colonizing these fishes regarding their roles in the digestive processes of hosts feeding predominantly on polysiphonous red algae and brown Turbinaria algae, which contain different polysaccharide constituents. Using metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and metatranscriptomic analyses, we provide evidence of metabolic diversification of enteric microbiota involved in the degradation of algal biomass in these fishes. The enteric microbiota is also phylogenetically and functionally simple relative to the complex lignocellulose-degrading microbiota of terrestrial herbivores. Over 90% of the enzymes for deconstructing algal polysaccharides emanate from members of a single bacterial lineage,en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Bioscience Core Lab, the Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab, and T. Sinclair-Taylor for their technical and logistical support. We also thank John Howard Choat (James Cook University, Queensland) for his insights on surgeonfish nutrition, Andreas Brune (Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg) for assistance with bacterial nomenclature, and Calder J. Atta (KAUST) for the fish illustrations. This work was supported by KAUST through the Saudi Economic and Development Company Research Excellence Award Program (U.S.).en
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/08/22/1703070114.fullen
dc.subjectMarine algaeen
dc.subjectCarbohydrasesen
dc.subjectEpulopisciumen
dc.subjectGiant Enteric Symbiontsen
dc.subjectPiscine Herbivoresen
dc.titleGenomic diversification of giant enteric symbionts reflects host dietary lifestylesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionTemasek Life Sciences Laboratory, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117604.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Animal Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.en
dc.contributor.institutionBioinformatics and Systems Biology, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.en
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.en
kaust.authorNgugi, Daviden
kaust.authorMiyake, Souen
kaust.authorCahill, Matthewen
kaust.authorVinu, Manikandanen
kaust.authorTietbohl, Matthewen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
kaust.authorStingl, Ulrichen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.