Stress-enhanced lithiation in MAX compounds for battery applications

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625715
Title:
Stress-enhanced lithiation in MAX compounds for battery applications
Authors:
Zhu, Jiajie ( 0000-0002-1930-7884 ) ; Chroneos, Alexander; Wang, Lei; Rao, Feng; Schwingenschlögl, Udo ( 0000-0003-4179-7231 )
Abstract:
Li-ion batteries are well-established energy storage systems. Upon lithiation conventional group IVA compound anodes undergo large volume expansion and thus suffer from stress-induced performance degradation. Instead of the emerging MXene anodes fabricated by an expensive and difficult-to-control etching technique, we study the feasibility of utilizing the parent MAX compounds. We reveal that M2AC (M=Ti, V and A=Si, S) compounds repel lithiation at ambient conditions, while structural stress turns out to support lithiation, in contrast to group IVA compounds. For V2SC the Li diffusion barrier is found to be lower than reported for group IVA compound anodes, reflecting potential to achieve fast charge/discharge.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Zhu J, Chroneos A, Wang L, Rao F, Schwingenschlögl U (2017) Stress-enhanced lithiation in MAX compounds for battery applications. Applied Materials Today 9: 192–195. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmt.2017.07.002.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Applied Materials Today
Issue Date:
31-Jul-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmt.2017.07.002
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2352-9407
Sponsors:
The research reported in this publication was supported by funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (61622408).
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352940717301610
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jiajieen
dc.contributor.authorChroneos, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Leien
dc.contributor.authorRao, Fengen
dc.contributor.authorSchwingenschlögl, Udoen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-03T12:49:35Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-03T12:49:35Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-31en
dc.identifier.citationZhu J, Chroneos A, Wang L, Rao F, Schwingenschlögl U (2017) Stress-enhanced lithiation in MAX compounds for battery applications. Applied Materials Today 9: 192–195. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmt.2017.07.002.en
dc.identifier.issn2352-9407en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apmt.2017.07.002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625715-
dc.description.abstractLi-ion batteries are well-established energy storage systems. Upon lithiation conventional group IVA compound anodes undergo large volume expansion and thus suffer from stress-induced performance degradation. Instead of the emerging MXene anodes fabricated by an expensive and difficult-to-control etching technique, we study the feasibility of utilizing the parent MAX compounds. We reveal that M2AC (M=Ti, V and A=Si, S) compounds repel lithiation at ambient conditions, while structural stress turns out to support lithiation, in contrast to group IVA compounds. For V2SC the Li diffusion barrier is found to be lower than reported for group IVA compound anodes, reflecting potential to achieve fast charge/discharge.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this publication was supported by funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (61622408).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352940717301610en
dc.subjectLi-ion batteryen
dc.subjectMXeneen
dc.subjectEnergy storageen
dc.titleStress-enhanced lithiation in MAX compounds for battery applicationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Materials Todayen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Ave 3688, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518060, People's Republic of Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Engineering, Environment and Computing, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdomen
kaust.authorZhu, Jiajieen
kaust.authorSchwingenschlögl, Udoen
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